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131B-1919 



&att 3temrtani, (California 



A. M. D. G. 



St. Ignatius University 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



FOUNDED, OCTOBER, 1855 
CHARTERED, APRIL, 1859 



I918-I919 



The Corporate Title of the University is: 



THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
OF ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rev. PATRICK J. FOOTE, S. J., President 
Rev. DENIS J. MAHONY, S. J., Secretary 
Rev. JAMES A. COLLIGAN, S. J., Treasurer 
Rev. WILLIAM H. COLLIGAN, S. J. 
Rev. JOHN J. CUNNINGHAM, S. J. 
Rev. JULIUS EGLOFFSTEIN, S. J. 
Rev. JOSEPH T. MORTON, S. J. 
Rev. JOHN B. SARDI, S. J. 
Rev. JOSEPH C. SASIA, S. J. 
Rev. VINCENT TESTA, S. J. 



San Francisco 
Press of The James H. Barry Co. 
1122-1124 Mission Street 
1918 



Faculty of the University 



OFFICERS 

Rev. PATRICK J. FOOTE, S. J. 
President 

Rev. JOHN J. CUNNINGHAM, S. J. 
Vice-President and Director of Studies 

Rev. ANTHONY R. DRATHMAN, S. J. 
Moderator of Discipline and Registrar of the University 

Rev. JAMES A. COLLIGAN, S. J. 
Treasurer 

Rev. JAMES J. HAYES, S. J. 
Chaplain 



Rev. DENIS J. MAHONY, S. J. 
Secretary 



STAFF 

IN THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS, SCIENCE AND 
PHILOSOPHY 

Rev. JAMES J. HAYES, S. J. 
Professor of Natural Theology, Ethics and Psychology 

Rev. EUGENE S. OLIVER, S. J. 
Professor of Logic, Ontology and Cosmology, Philos- 
ophy of Religion, History of Philosophy 
and Political Economy 

Rev. JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Rev. GEORGE A. GILBERT, S. J. 
Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

Rev. JOSEPH T. MORTON, S. J. 
Rev. DENNIS J. KAVANAGH, S. J. 
Professors of Letters 

Rev. JOSEPH SPANGEMACHER, S. J. 
Rev. MARTIN J. MAHER, S. J. 
Professors of German 

Rev. PETER C. BOUGIS, S. J. 
Rev. LEO DAVROUT, S. J. 
Professors of French 

Rev. JOHN B. SARDI, S. J. 
Rev. JOHN J. CUNNINGHAM, S. J. 
Professors of Spanish 



IN THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



MATT I. SULLIVAN, A. B., LL. B., LL. D. 
Dean of the College of Law 

GEORGE A. CONNOLLY, A. M., LL. B, LL. D. 
Professor of Law 

WILLIAM A. BREEN, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 
Professor of Law 

STANISLAUS A. RILEY, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 
Professor of Lazv 

JOHN O'GARA, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 
Professor of Law 

JOSEPH A. FARRY, A. B., LL. B., LL. D. 
Professor of Law 

JOSEPH W. BERETTA, A. B., LL. B., iJL. D. 
Professor of Law 

BENJAMIN L. McKINLEY, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 
Professor of Law 

Rev. JAMES J. HAYES, S. J. 
Professor of Ethics 

Rev. EUGENE S. OLIVER, S. J. 
Professor of Logic, Psychology, and Natural Theology 



FRANCIS B. LESSMANN, A. B., B. S. 
Registrar 



IN THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY, B. E. 

(Royal University of Dublin) 
Dean of the College of Engineering 

FRANCIS B. LESSMANN, A. B., B. S. 
Professor of Engineering, Analytics and Calculus 

Rev. PATRICK J. FOOTE, S. J. 
Professor of Analytic Mechanics 

Rev. JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Rev. GEORGE A. GILBERT, S. J. 
Professor of Physics and Mathematics 



IN THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

CHESTER D. SEWALL, M. D. 
Professor of Bacteriology, Biology and Histology 

Rev. JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. 
Professor of Chemistry 

Rev. GEORGE A. GILBERT, S. J. 
Professor of Physics 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofstigna1917univ 



A. M. D. G. 



PROSPECTUS 



FOUNDATION AND CHARTER 

St. Ignatius College, an educational institution 
with literary, scientific and philosophical courses of study, 
was founded in 1855. It was incorporated by the State 
of California, April 30, 1859, under the style and title of 
St. Ignatius College, and empowered to confer aca- 
demical degrees, with "such literary honors as are granted 
by any University in the United States." 

In the month of September, 1906, Special Courses 
for the last two undergraduate years were added to the 
general course. These included Graphics and Field 
Work for prospective students of Engineering; Biology 
for prospective students of Medicine; and Jurisprudence 
and Constitutional and Legal History for prospective 
students of Law. 

In September, 1912, the professional branches of 
Law and Civil Engineering were introduced, and the 
institution assumed the name of St. Ignatius Univer- 
sity. 

DIRECTORS AND AIM 

The University is conducted by the Fathers of the 
Society of Jesus. As educators they aim at procuring 
the development of both mind and heart. They recognize 



10 



St. Ignatius University 



moral training as an essential element of education, and 
therefore, while striving to give the youth committed to 
their charge the higher mental culture, they spare no 
effort to form them also to habits of virtue. 

COURSES OF STUDIES 

The University embraces the following depart- 
ments : The College of Letters, Science and Philosophy ; 
the College of Law; the College of Engineering and the 
Pre-medical Course. 

DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon 
those who, having obtained a yearly average of seventy 
per cent, in each of the studies of the University Course, 
are found, after an oral examination before the Faculty, 
to be deserving of this distinction. This degree is given 
to those only who have completed the Course of 
Letters, Science and Philosophy. 

The degree of Master of Arts is conferred on those 
who, having received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
shall have passed further satisfactory examinations. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil En- 
gineering and the degree of Bachelor of Laws are 
conferred on those who complete these courses success- 
fully. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The scholastic year consists of one session extend- 
ing from August to June. The session is divided into 
two semesters, one ending with the 
Scholastic mid-year examinations in December, 

Year the other with the Annual Commence- 

ment Exercises in June. 



Prospectus 



Every candidate for admission must present testi- 
monials of his good moral character. If he come from 
another institution, he will be required 
Admission tQ bring . a certificate of good standing 

from the one which he has left. Students not of the 
Catholic faith are expected to conform respectfully to the 
religious exercises of the University. 

Candidates for admission into the University 
Courses are required to have completed 
Requirements successfully the St. Ignatius or some 

for Admission , : __. , , , 

other standard High School. 

The progress of each student and his standing in 
class are finally determined by thorough examinations, 
which are held at the close of each se- 

Examinatlons 

and ordinary mester. The annual promotions are de- 
Promotions cided by averaging the monthly marks 

of the entire year with those obtained in the examina- 
tions. Seventy per cent, in each of the principal 
branches is required. 

Every month reports are sent to parents or guardians 
informing* them of the conduct, standing 

Reports of & . . ' . & 

class- and attendance of their sons or wards, 

standing These reports should be signed and re- 

turned at once. 

All the endeavors of the Officers and Instructors will 
fail to insure success unless the students prepare with 
diligence and constancy their exercises 

Home-Study - . . . , — 

and Daily and recitations to be given in class. Par- 

Lessons ents, therefore, are respectfully urged to 

see that their sons devote at least tzifo hours every day 
to the study of their lessons at home, and to notify the 



12 



St. Ignatius University 



Director of Studies if this private study has been neg- 
lected. Students who come unprepared to recite, or 
without having their written exercises ready, are looked 
upon as morally absent, and, like absentees, they must 
bring satisfactory written excuses from their parents 
to the Director of Studies to avoid censure. 



Class begins at nine o'clock. Should any student 
reach the University after that hour, he 
Regularity and w jn not ^ admitted to his class with- 

Punctuality 

out a note from the Prefect of Disci- 
pline. 



Students must not be absent from the University 
except for grave reasons; in which case, as also in case 
of tardiness, a note of excuse from a parent or guardian 
is invariably required. Mere absence does not excuse a 
student from the obligation of preparing his ordinary 
recitations. Frequent absence or tardiness, except on 
account of illness, is sufficient cause for permanent dis- 
missal. 



The University expects from all its students the 
manners and deportment of gentlemen, and endeavors to 
procure the practice of perfect decorum 
politeness at a jj t j mes w ;thin its precincts. For 

conduct outside it does not hold itself responsible. In 
justice to itself, however, it must take cognizance of any 
serious misconduct of its students, though committed 
outside its walls. 



Prospectus 



13 



Though the government of the University is mild 
rather than severe, yet for the maintenance of order and 
discipline, without which good results in 
Discipline mental and moral training are impossi- 

ble, punctual attendance, strict obedience, assiduous ap- 
plication and blameless conduct are required of every 
student. Any serious neglect of these essential points 
subjects the offender to effective correction, and even to 
dismissal, if this be necessary. 

When the withdrawal of students is con- 
witndrawai templated, due notice should be given the 

of Students 

University authorities. 



To attain the end which the Faculty of St. Ignatius 
University have set before themselves, to wit, the in- 
tellectual and moral advancement and 
Religion and perfection of their charges, the Cath- 

Morals * . 6 ' 

ohc students are required to receive the 
Sacraments of Penance and the Holy Eucharist at least 
once a month, and are exhorted to be present at the 
Holy Sacrifice of the Mass as frequently as possible. 
A public instruction on the doctrines of the Catholic 
faith is given weekly to all the students, in the College 
Chapel. 



EXPENSES 



As the institution is not endowed, it is entirely de- 
pendent, for its support, on the fees paid for tuition. 



14 



St. Ignatius University 



TUITION 

PAYABLE IN MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS IN ADVANCE. 

Courses of Letters, Science, Philosophy and Law 

or Engineering or Biology $80.00 

Course of Law only or Engineering only 50.00 

Preparatory or High School Course 50.00 



EXTRA CHARGES 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 

For the use of Apparatus and Chemicals in 
Physical and Chemical Laboratories, each 

semester 10.00 

For the use of Apparatus and Material in the 

Pre-Medical Course, each semester 15.00 

For the use of Engineering Instruments, each 

semester 15.00 

For each Academical Degree 10.00 

For High School Diploma 1.50 

For Drawing, each semester 10.00 

For any examination taken out of time or to re- 
move a condition 2.00 

Student-Body Fee, each semester 3.00 

Fee for late registration 1.00 



THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS, 
SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY 



16 



St. Ignatius University 



THE COLLEGE OF LETTERS, SCIENCE 
AND PHILOSOPHY 



Admission Requirements in English, Latin, Greek, 
Mathematics and Science are those proposed in United 
States Bureau of Education Bulletin, number 511, pages 
143-170, besides Christian Doctrine, as outlined in St. 
Ignatius High School Schedule of Courses. Graduates 
of approved High Schools will be received on presenta- 
tion of satisfactory credentials for work done in ac- 
cordance with aforesaid requirements. 

COURSES 

EVIDENCES OF RELIGION 

1 — Freshman. Two hours a week. 

Wilmer's Handbook of the Christian Religion 
from page 200 to page 349. Reference, Sasia- 
Devivier, S. J., Christian Apologetics ; The 
Catholic Encyclopedia; Sasia, S. J., The Future 
Life. 

2 — Sophomore. Two hours a week. 

Wilmer's Handbook of the Catholic Religion, 
from page 349 to end of book. Reference, 
Sasia-Devivier, S. J., Christian Apologetics; 
The Catholic Encyclopedia; Sasia, S. J., The 
Future Life. 

3 — Junior. Two hours a week. 

Wilmer's Handbook of the Christian Religion, 
from page 1 to page 200. Reference, Sasia- 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 17 



Devivier, S. J., Christian Apologetics; The 
Catholic Encyclopedia; Sasia, S. J., The Future 
Life. 

4 — Senior. Two hours a week. 

Nos. 1, 2 and 3 thoroughly reviewed. Refer- 
ence, Sasia-Devivier, S. J., Christian Apolo- 
getics ; The Catholic Encyclopedia ; Sasia, S. J., 
The Future Life. 

LATIN 

Freshman. Six hours a week. 

1 — Precepts: Prosody reviewed and applied. 
Text: Butler, Latin Versification. 
Reference: Kleutgen, S. J., Ars Dicendi; 

Coppens, S. J., Introduction to Rhetoric; 
Gepp's Latin Elegiac Verse; Lupton's 
Latin Lyrics. 

2 — Authors: Ovid, Elegiae, Tristia. 

Vergil, Bucolics, 1, 2, 3, 9; Georgics, IV; 

and Aeneid VII, XI, XII. 
Horace, Ars Poetica, Epodes I. 
Catullus, Carmina. 

Cicero, Pro Ligario, Pro Marcello, Pro 
Lege Manilia. 

3 — Practice: Thorough discussion of matter, 

form and style of authors read, according 
to the laws of Rhetoric and Poetry. 
Latin Versification. 

Two themes in prose weekly ; one in verse 
monthly. 

4 — Sight Reading: Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2; 

Livy, Historiae I. 



18 



St. Ignatius University 



Sophomore. Six hours a week. 

5 — Precepts: The Construction of Orations; 

Review of Rules for Epic and Dramatic 
Poetry. 

Reference: Kleutgen, S. J., Ars Dicendi; 
Encyclopedia Britannica. 

6 — Authors: Vergil, Aeneid, V and VI. 

Horace, Odes, Book III; Satires, I. 
Cicero, Pro Milone, Pro Cluentio, Phil- 
ippics, I and II. 

7 — Practice: Collateral reading on the different 

phases of Roman life as depicted or 
hinted at in the authors read. 
Two themes in prose weekly ; one in verse 
monthly. A comparative study of the 
Roman and English Drama. 

8 — Sight Reading: Cicero, De Signis; De Ora- 

tore ; Seneca, Tragediae. 
Quintilian, Institutes. 

GREEK 

Freshman. Five hours a week. 

1 — Precepts: Rules of Prosody applied to au- 

thors read ; the Accents ; the Dialects. 
Reference : Yenni, S. J. ; Kaegi-Kleist, Greek 
Grammar; Goodwin, Greek Moods and 
Tenses. 

2 — Authors : Homer, Iliad I, II and Odyssey V. ; 

Euripides, Hecuba, Philoctetes; 

St. John Chrysostom, In Eutropium ; 

Isocrates, Demonicus. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 19 



3 — Practice: Analytical discussion of authors 

read, according to the laws of Rhetoric 
and good taste. 
Two themes weekly. 

4 — Sight Reading: Herodotus, Anacreon, 

Hesiod. 

Sophomore. Five hours a week. 

5 — Precepts : Laws of Oratorical and Dramatic 

Composition ; Ancient and Modern Greek 
compared. 

Reference : Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics ; 
Encyclopedia Britannica. 

6 — Authors : Demosthenes, Olythiacs I and II; 

De Corona; 
Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound ; 
Sophocles, Oedipus the King; 
Thucydides, Peloponnesian War. 
Pindar, Odes. 

7 — Practice: Comparative study of Latin and 

English authors formed on the Greek 
models; analysis of poems and orations 
read, according to the laws of Rhetoric 
and Poetry. 
Reference: Blair's Lectures; Whately; 
Coppens, S. J. 

8 — Sight Reading: Acts of the Apostles; St. 

Luke's Gospel; Herodotus, Histories. 



20 



St. Ignatius University 



ENGLISH 

Freshman. Five hours a week. 

1 — Precepts: Brief review of the elements of 

the Art of Rhetoric as to style or diction 
and the different kinds of prose composi- 
tion except the oration. The Art of 
Poetry, poetical fiction and diction, the 
various kinds of poetry exclusive of the 
Epic and the Drama. Theories of the 
Sublime and the Beautiful, Taste and 
Criticism. 

Text: Coppens, S. J., Introduction to Rhe- 
toric; Boynton, Principles of Composition. 

Reference : The Encyclopedia Britannica ; 
Blair's Lectures ; 
Rother, S. J., on Beauty; 
Burke on the Sublime and the Beautiful ; 
Kleutgen, S. J., Ars Dicendi ; 
Gayley & Scott, Literary Criticism ; 
Sherman, Analytics of Literature ; 
Shairp's Essays ; Pater, On Style. 

2 — Authors: Milton's Lycidas, II Penseroso, 

L' Allegro, Comus. 
Shelley's Adonais; 

Wordsworth's Recollections of Immortality ; 
Tennyson, The Holy Grail, In Memoriam ; 
Minor Poems in Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury. 

3 — Practice: Literary Analysis of masterpieces 

read. Composition in prose and verse in 
imitation of models studied. Vocal inter- 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 21 



prctation and expression of selected pas- 
sages perfectly memorized, and of others 
taken at random from Browning, Tenny- 
son, Shelley and Dryden. 

4 — History of Literature: First semester. The 

Lake School to Victorian Age included, 
1745-1909; 

Second semester, from Spenser to Pope. 
Text: Long's English Literature. 

Reference: Encyclopedia Britannica; 
Ward's English Poets, Vols. Ill and IV; 
Gosse, 18th Century Literature ; 
Stedman, Victorian Poets ; 
Ward's Dramatic Poetry. 

Sophomore. Five hours a week. 

5 — Precepts: The Oration; Invention; Topics; 

Emotions ; Arrangement, Introduction, 
Proposition, Division, Argumentation, 
Refutation, Conclusion ; Kinds of Oratory. 

The Epic; its story, plot, development, 
personages. The Unities : Rules. 

The Drama. Tragedy ; its nature ; the char- 
acters ; the parts, — protasis, epitasis and 
catastrophe ; the acts and scenes ; the dia- 
logue ; stage devices. The Classic drama 
as contrasted with the Romantic. The 
Unities further illustrated. 

Comedy; its nature, etc. 

Text: Coppens, S. J., Art of Oratorical 
Composition. 



St. Ignatius University 



Reference: Encyclopedia Britannica; 
Blair's Lectures; Adam's Lectures; 
Genung, Working Principles; 
Goodrich's British Eloquence; 
Garnet & Gosse, History of English Lit- 
erature ; 
Kleutgen, S. J., Ars Dicendi; 
Campbell, Guide to Greek Tragedy. 

6 — Authors: Burke, Conciliation of American 

Colonies ; 

Webster, Reply to Hayne; 
Newman, Second Spring; 
Milton, Paradise Lost I, II ; 
Palgrave's Golden Treasury ; 
Dryden, Hind and Panther; 
Butler, Hudibras; 
Pope, The Dunciad ; 
Spenser, Faerie Queene. 

7 — Practice: Analysis, oral and written, of au- 

thors read ; original orations ; plans of 
orations. Criticism of books read or ora- 
tors heard. Narrative Poems ; Epic 
sketches ; original playlets along tragic or 
comic lines. Weekly Compositions. Ren- 
dering of memorized selections from au- 
thors read and criticism by Professor and 
Classmates. Extemporaneous reading and 
criticism of oratorical, dramatic and epic 
selections. 

8 — History of Literature: First semester. Be- 

ginnings of English Literature and early 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 23 



developments through Anglo-Saxon, Nor- 
man and fusion periods, from author of 
Beowulf and Caedmon to Spenser exclu- 
sive. 

Text: Long's English Literature. 

Second semester. American Literary De- 
velopment and Achievement from the 
Puritans to our own times. 

Text: Long's American Literature. 

Reference: As outlined in Long's English 
Literature, pp. XVIII to XXI. 

HISTORY 
Freshman. Two hours a week. 

1— History of the Middle Ages— The Migration 
of Nations ; The Development of the Papacy 
and the Holy Roman Empire ; The Crusades ; 
The Feudal System ; The Rise of the Uni- 
versities ; The Work of the Religious Orders ; 
The Scholastics. 

Text: Guggenberger's History. 
Reference: The Catholic Encyclopedia; 

Mann's History of the Popes ; 

Parsons' Studies in Church History. 

Sophomore. Two hours a week. 

2 — Modern History. The Pagan Renaissance; Dis- 
covery of America ; The Protestant Reforma- 
tion in Germany, Scandinavia, France, Eng- 
land. The Jesuits; The Jansenists; The En- 
cyclopedists ; The French Revolution ; The 
Development of Religious Tolerance; Catholic 
Emancipation. Wars of the 19th Century. 
Politics in Germany, Italy, France, England 



24 



St. Ignatius University 



and the United States. The war between the 
Central Powers and the Allies. 

Text: Guggenberger's History. 

Reference: Pastor's History of the Popes; 
Parsons' Studies in Church History; 
Gasquet's Works; 
Madelin, The French Revolution. 

3 — Junior. Two hours a week. First semester. 
History of Philosophy, from the Pre-Socratic 

Period to Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. 

Text: Turner's History of Philosophy. 

4 — Senior. Two hours a week. First semester. 
The History of the Philosophy of the Christian 

Era. Patristic Philosophy; — Ante-Nicene and 
Post-Nicene Fathers ; Scholastic Philosophy, 
Its Rise and Its Decline ; Modern Philosophy 
from Bacon and Descartes to Kant ; Contem- 
porary Philosophy. 

Text: Turner's History of Philosophy. 



ECONOMICS 

1 — Junior. Two hours a week. Second semester. 
Introduction to Economics. Productive Capaci- 
ties of Man — Industrial Organization ; Indus- 
trial Progress; Locality and Industrial Di- 
mensions; Theory of Consumption; Particu- 
lars of Consumption; Family Life and Law; 
Growth and Decay of Nations; Malthusian- 
ism; Trade in general; Market and non- 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 25 



market Prices ; Differential Gains ; Interna- 
tional Trade ; Tariffs. 

Text: Burke. 

Reference : Devas. 

2 — Senior. Two hours a week. Second semester. 
Money ; Coinage and Tokens ; Credit and 

Banking; Commercial and Uncommercial 

Credits ; Profits ; Interest. 
Wages; Rich and Poor; Trade Unions and 

Employers' Associations ; Public Finance ; 

Cost of Government ; Taxation ; Different 

Kinds of Taxation; Public Debts. 

Text: Burke. 
Reference : Devas. 



PHYSICS 

COURSE I— GENERAL PHYSICS 

Freshman — First Semester 

Lectures and Recitations, Two Hours; Laboratory, 
Four Hours, Four Units 

Mechanics. Properties of matter. Kinematics. 
Dynamics. Mechanics of fluids. 

Heat. Nature and effect of heat; transmission 
and radiation of heat. Thermo-dynamics. 

Prerequisite, Matriculation High School Physics. 



26 



St. Ignatius University 



COURSE II— GENERAL PHYSICS 

Freshman — Second Semester 

Lectures and Recitations, Two Hours; Laboratory, 
Four Hours, Four Units 

Sound. Waves. Production and transmission of 
sound. Physical basis of music. 

Prerequisite, Course I. 

COURSE III— GENERAL PHYSICS 

Junior — First Semester 

Lectures and Recitations, Two Hours; Laboratory, 
Four Hours, Four Units 

Light. Nature and propagation of light. Light 
as a wave motion. Sensation of color. Polarized 
light. Optical instruments. 

Prerequisite, Courses I and II. 

COURSE IV— GENERAL PHYSICS 

Junior — Second Semester 

Magnetism and Electricity. Magnets and mag- 
netic fields. Electrostatics. Electric currents. Electro- 
magnetism. Electromagnetic induction. Dynamo- 
Electric machines. Electric Oscillations and waves. 
Passage of electricity through gases. 

Prerequisite, Course III. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 27 



COURSE V— GENERAL PHYSICS 
Lecture, Two Hours; Laboratory, Three Hours, Five Units 
The Year 

Mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, 
light, energy transformation, electricity and magne- 
tism. 

This Course is an abridgment of Courses I, II, 
III and IV, and is intended only for those students 
whose future professional studies require one year 
of College Physics. 

Prerequisite, High School Physics. 

COURSE VI— PHOTOGRAPHY 
The Year 

Lecture, One Hour; Laboratory, Two Hours, Three Units 

COURSE VII— SPECIAL LABORATORY WORK 
The Year 

Matter assigned according to the requirements 
of individual students. 

Credit to be arranged. 

COURSE VIII— READINGS AND DISCUSSIONS 

The Year 

Selected topics assigned. 
Credit to be arranged. 



28 



57. Ignatius University 



CHEMISTRY 



COURSE I — INORGANIC 
Sophomore 

Lectures and Recitations, Three Periods; Laboratory 
Six Periods 

The course presents systematically the principles 
and fundamental laws of the science. The classifica- 
tion and study of the non-metallic elements, their 
compounds and characteristics, follow the Atomic theory 
without discredit to the accepted notions of the Ioniza- 
tion of matter. , 

Chemical reactions, valence, structural formulas and 
calculation are given due attention and the principles 
of Thermo-chemistry discussed experimentally. 

The metallic elements in detail, the principles of 
Metallurgy, determination of atomic weights and in- 
dustrial applications complete the treatises and give the 
fundamental preparation for applying the methods of 
analysis. 

Text: Cady's Inorganic Chemistry; Hildebrand, 
Principles of Chemistry. 

Prerequisite, one year of entrance Chemistry. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 29 



COURSE II— QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

Sophomore 

Four Periods, One Semester 

The entire Blowpipe method and the accepted pro- 
cedures for the recognition of the metals by the Wet 
method. 

Texts : Getman's Blowpipe Analysis ; Bivins' Quali- 
tative Analysis. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

COURSE III— QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 
Sophomore (Engineering and Pre-Medical) 
Five Periods, One Semester 

An extended course comprising lectures, confer- 
ences and laboratory practice. The separation and iden- 
tification of the metals and acids must be conducted 
with precision in technique. 

Text: Newth's Manual of Chemical Analysis. 
Fresenius-Cohn. 

Prerequisite, Course 2. 

COURSE IV— QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

Sophomore (Engineering and Pre-Medical) 

Six Periods, One Semester 

The Gravimetric and Volumetric methods are ap- 
plied so as to emphasize the theory and laws of Chem- 
istry. 

Text: Talbot, Newth, Treadwell-Hall. 
Prerequisite, Course 3. 



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St. Ignatius University 



COURSE V— ASSAYING 
Sophomore (Engineering only) 
Four Periods, One Semester 

The crushing and sampling of ores. Field tests. 
The methods of the fire-assay for the determination of 
gold, silver, lead, and bullion content, furnace products 
and other materials for which this method is suitable. 

Text: Fulton's Manual of Assaying. 

Prerequisite, Course 3 and desirably 4. 

COURSE VI— ORGANIC 
Senior 

Lectures and Recitations, Three Periods; Laboratory, 
Three Periods 

The subjects covered are embraced under these 
heads : The nature and sources of organic compounds, 
their isolation and recognition. The Paraffin series with 
special notice of Petroleum distillates. The Alcohols 
and their derivatives. The Fats, Sugars, Aromatic 
compounds, Coal tar products, technology of dyes, 
Alkaloids, Proteins, Foods. 

Text: Norris' Principles of Organic Chemistry. 
Remsen's Organic Chemistry. 
Laboratory Manual, Biddle or Norris. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 
COURSE VII— QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 

Senior 

Three Periods, One Semester 

Methods of the ultimate organic analysis. Prepara- 
tion of synthetic compounds. Systematic procedures for 
identifying organic compounds and mixtures. 

Text: Prescott, Organic Analysis. 

Prerequisite, Course 6. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 31 



COURSE VIII— BIOCHEMISTRY 

Nature and activity of Enzymes, Starches, Salivary 
digestion, Proteins, Gastric digestion, Fats, Pancreatic 
digestion, Intestinal digestion, Products of metabolism 
and putrefaction, Excreta, Bile, Blood, Milk, Struc- 
tural tissues. Qualitative and quantitative work on the 
digestive fluids, urine and milk. 

Lectures and recitations, two periods. (Both Se- 
mesters.) 

Laboratory, 4 periods. (One Semester.) 

Text: Hawk's Practical Physiological Chemistry. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry Courses, 1, 3, 4, 6. 

COURSE IX— ELECTIVE COURSE IN CHEMISTRY 
Senior 
One Period, One Semester 

Illustrated lectures treating the principal aspects 
of Chemical Technology as applied in the industries. 

Toxicology, its aim and methods, as applied in 
Forensic Medicine. 

COURSE X— NIGHT COURSE IN PRACTICAL 
CHEMISTRY 

One Period 

Open to all students qualified to follow some line 
of work without detailed instruction. 



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St. Ignatius University 



MATHEMATICS 



I — Freshman. Five Periods. Both semesters. 

1. College Algebra. — Ratio and Proportion, pro- 
gressions, surds, imaginary and complex numbers, bino- 
mial theorem, logarithms, permutations and combina- 
tions, determinants. 

2. Spherical Trigonometry. — Formulas ; solutions 
of spherical triangles with some applications to As- 
tronomy. 

3. Analytical Geometry. — Coordinates linear and 
polar ; transformation ; conic sections and a few higher 
curves ; surfaces, especially of revolution. 

II — Sophomore. Five Periods. Both semesters. 
(Optional for students of Letters, Science and Philoso- 
phy Course; obligatory for Engineering Course.) 

1. Differential Calculus. — Single differentiation and 
chief formulas, applications to Geometry and Phyhics, 
successive and total differentiation, Taylor's and Mc- 
Laurin's formulas, maxima, minima and other applica- 
tions chiefly Geometrical. 

2. Integral Calculus. — Single integration and meth- 
ods, applications to Geometry and Physics, multiple in- 
tegration with applications to Mechanics especially. 

3. Differential Equations. — Solutions of the chief 
types of ordinary differential equations with applica- 
tions to Mechanics. Lectures and recitations, three 
periods. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 33 



Analytical Mechanics 
III — Junior. Five Periods. Both semesters. 

{Optional for Students, etc., as in II). 

An advanced mathematical course on the kinemat- 
ics, dynamics and statics of material particles and rigid 
bodies. Kinematics of a point moving rectilinearly 
or curvilinearly, and of a body moving transitionally, 
rotationally or with an uniplanar motion. Dynamics 
of a point; work, energy, impulse, kinetic and poten- 
tial energies, moment and moment of inertia-dynamics 
of a rigid body. Statics, conditions for equilibrium, 
application to flexible cords. 

Text: Theoretical Mechanics, Smith & Longley. 
Technical Mechanics, Maurer. 



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PHILOSOPHY 



JUNIOR. Seven Hours. Both Semesters. 
Course 1. 

Logic. — 

I. Minor Logic. Terms, mental and verbal. Their 
classifications. Analogy and kinds of analogy. Predica- 
bles. Predicaments. Suppositions and kinds of supposi- 
tion. Definition and laws of definition. Division and 
laws of division. Judgments and propositions. Their 
classifications. Opposition, equivalence and conversion 
of propositions. Reasoning and argumentation. Their 
classifications. Syllogism; its nature, laws, figures and 
moods. Method. Method of discussion known as "the 
Circle. ,, 

II. — Major Logic. Conceptual truth. Various states 
of the mind taken with respect to its possession of 
truth : Ignorance, error, doubt, opinion and certitude. 
Trustworthiness of all the human faculties for the ac- 
quisition of truth: Scepticism and its manifold schools. 
The validity of universal ideas in particular: Nominal- 
ism, conceptualism, ultra-realism and realism. Trust- 
worthiness of human testimony. Tradition and history. 
Historical method and higher criticism. Divine testi- 
mony or revelation. The motives of human certitude. 
The ultimate motive or intrinsic evidence. 

III. — Methodology of the natural sciences. Obser- 
vation and experiment. Mill's canons. Explanation. 
Hypothesis. Measurement. Chance and probability. 
Statistics. Classification. 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 35 



Ontology. — 

Real being and its transcendental attributes: unity, 
truth and goodness. Aetual and possible being. Sub- 
stance and person. Accidents, absolute and relative. 
The causes of real being : Material, formal, efficient and 
final. Perfection. Beauty. 

Cosmology. — 

The general static property of all corporeal things, 
extension or continuous quantity. Space and place. The 
general dynamic property of all corporeal things, motion 
or change from place to place. Time. Change or 
variation. Its kinds: Locomotion, expansion and con- 
traction, qualitative change and substantial change. 
Theories concerning the constitution of bodies: Atom- 
ism, dynamism and hylomorphism. 

Biology. — 

Life in general and organic life in particular. Cel- 
lular life. The cell. Nuclear division and karyokinesis. 
Maturation, division and fertilization. Cell-theory of 
heredity. Mendelism. The cell and spontaneous gen- 
eration. Vegetative life. Its chief functions: Nourish- 
ment, growth and propagation. Its essential superiority 
to all anorganic activity (mechanical, physical or chemi- 
cal) simply or complexly considered. Sensitive life. 
Its chief functions: Sensation, appetition and locomo- 
tion. Its essential superiority to all vegetative $nd anor- 
ganic activity. Its essential inferiority to human reason 
and will. Theories on the origin of species : Lamarck- 
ism, Darwinism, Weissmanism and De Vriesism. 

SENIOR. Seven Hours. 



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St. Ignatius University 



Course 2. 
Psychology. — 

I. — Definition. Division. Differences between Psy- 
chology, Cosmology, Logic and Ethics. Life in general. 
Divisions. Differences between living and non-living 
bodies. Plant life. Its chief functions. Inner nature of 
plant life. Physical and chemical forces and their rela- 
tion to life. The vital principle. Unity of plant life. 
Origin of plant life. Theories regarding the nature of 
plant life. Theories regarding its origin, biogenesis, 
abiogenesis, heterogenesis. 

II. — Sentient life. Definitions, true and false. Sen- 
sation. Properties of sensation. Cognitive character of 
sensation. External senses. Internal senses. Scholastic 
doctrine regarding sensation and the senses. Imagina- 
tion, productive, reproductive, aesthetic, scientific. Illu- 
sions. Dreams. Memory. Laws of association. Sen- 
suous appetite. The scholastic doctrine of appetency. 
Theories of pleasure and pain. 

III. — Rational psychology. Intellect and sense. 
Essential differences. Erroneous views. Sensationalism, 
materialism, evolutionism. The origin of ideas. False 
theories. Inborn ideas, empiricism, ontologism. The 
scholastic theory. Universal ideas. Judgments and 
their process of formation. Reasoning. Reflexion. 
Growth of self-knowledge. Unity. Continuity and dis- 
continuity of consciousness. Rational appetency. Voli- 
tion. Free will and determinism. Argument from 
ethical concepts. Obligation, merit and demerit. Re- 
sponsibility. Sanction. Deliberation. Decision. Meta- 
physical argument. 

IV. — Nature of the human soul. Simplicity, spirit- 
uality, substantiality, identity, unity of the soul. Union 



College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 37 



of soul and body. False theories. Scholastic doctrine. 
Origin of the human soul. Its immortality. False 
theories. Unity of the human race. 

Theodicy. — 

I. — The existence of God. A personal being dis- 
tinct from the world. The intelligent first cause. Ar- 
gument from design. Moral argument. Metaphysical 
argument. Difficulties against the argument from de- 
sign. Difficulties against the argument from first cause. 

II. — The nature of God. The essence of God. Self- 
existence. Necessity, eternity, and immutability. False 
theories. Polytheism, Anthropomorphism, Materialism, 
Pantheism. 

III. — The divine intellect. The knowledge of God. 
Its divisions. Foreknowledge and human freedom. Di- 
vine freedom. The holiness and other attributes of the 
divine will. Origin of evil, physical and moral. Divine 
omnipotence. God's influence on the world. Divine 
preservation. Concurrence and Providence. Distribu- 
tion of temporal good and evil. Miracles. 

Ethics.— 

I. — General Ethics. 

Definition. Scope. Allied Sciences, Psychology, 
Political Philosophy. Method. The Science of ends. 
Last end, subjective and objective. Human acts and 
their nature. Morality. Its determinants. Its modifiers. 
The consequences. Imputability, merit, demerit, virtues, 
vices. 

False theories. Positivism, materialism, hedonism. 
Utilitarianism. Personal and public moral criteria. Fun- 



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St. Ignatius University 



damental moral criteria. Universality and immutability 
of the natural law. Differences between natural and 
positive law. Sanction. 

II. — Special Ethics. 

Right and duty. Properties of right. Division of 
rights and duties. Duties to God. Religion, natural and 
supernatural. Worship, interior and exterior, industrial 
and social. Duties to one's self. Intellectual and moral 
perfection. Preservation of life. Self-defense. Duties 
to fellow-men. Justice. Brotherly love. The intrinsic 
evil of the lie. Proprietary right. Prescription. Tes- 
tamentary right. Communism, agrarian socialism, the 
social democracy. 

HI. — Society in general. Origin. Division. Essen- 
tial elements. The sociability of man. The family. Its 
origin, unity, and necessity. Its indissolubility. The 
right of education. 

IV. — Civil and political society in general. Its 
origin and necessity. End or scope, remote and proxi- 
mate. Essential elements. Social organization. Sta- 
bility of government. Legislative, judicial, executive 
and coercive powers. Material social action. Agricul- 
ture, commerce, industry. Emigration, immigration. 
Labor organizations. Capitalistic organizations. Emi- 
nent domain. Education and the State. Arts and 
sciences. i 

V. — International law in general. General prin- 
ciples. The rights and duties of independent states. 
Property, social and political. Intervention. Treaties. 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



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St. Ignatius University 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 



I — Entrance Requirements 

Applicants under the following heads will be ad- 
mitted to the Freshman Year of Law without exam- 
ination : 

1. Graduates from Colleges and Universities. 

2. Graduates from Normal Schools or other in- 
stitutions having Collegiate standing. 

3. Students of any approved College or Univer- 
sity who have successfully completed Sophomore 
year. 

4. Graduates of Standard High Schools with 
four-year course equal to that of St. Ignatius Univer- 
sity High School. 

II — Special Students 

Special students also are received who are de- 
sirous of taking up the study of law not for the 
purpose of getting a degree, but either to specialize in 
some branch of the law, or the better to fit themselves 
for commercial or political life. 

The following applicants may be received as Spe- 
cial Students: 

1. Those who hold diplomas in Arts, Literature, 
Philosophy and Science. 

2. Those who have a general training that 
shall be deemed sufficient to qualify them to take up 
such special studies. 



The College of Law 



41 



THey may enter also at any time before the com- 
pletion of the Third Year of Law as candidates for a 
degree by successfully complying with the entrance 
requirements for regular students, by following the 
full course and passing their examinations success- 
fully as prescribed. Special courses are to be selected 
under the guidance of the Dean, and the same serious- 
ness and thoroughness will be required as are required 
of students in the regular course. 

Ill — Advanced Standing 

Applicants who have completed the Sophomore 
year in other approved Law schools will be admitted 
to advanced standing in St. Ignatius College of Law 
on presentation of satisfactory credentials. They will 
be required, however, to pass the Faculty Examinations 
at the end of Senior Year on all subjects laid down in 
our Four- Year Course. 

I V — Examinations 

Written examinations in each Subject must be 

passed by all the Students of Law at the end of 
each Semester. 

An oral Examination of thirty-five minutes before 

the Faculty in the subjects of the entire course of 

four years must be passed by Candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws. 

V — Degrees and Certificates 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws is conferred on 
all those who, having complied with the entrance re- 



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St. Ignatius University 



quirements, have passed satisfactorily the written and 
oral examinations above prescribed. Students who pass 
the final examinations before the Faculty with dis- 
tinguished excellence will receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws Cum laude. 

A certificate will be given to Special Students for 
satisfactory work on which they have specialized. 

VI — Mental Philosophy and Ethics 

A complete course in Mental Philosophy and 
Ethics throughout the four years is of obligation for 
all students of the Law who have not already satis- 
factorily completed those studies or who are not at- 
tending the day courses in the Junior or Senior Classes 
of the St. Ignatius University. 

No student can graduate or be promoted unless he 
pass successfully all examinations in these studies. 

VII — Attendance 

No student is eligible for any examination, nor 
is he entitled to credit, unless he has been in attend- 
ance at 80 per cent, of each of the classes. 

The Faculty reserves the right of insisting on 
attendance at certain lectures not in course which it 
shall deem conducive to the general good of the Law 
Students. 



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43 



THE COURSES 
First Year 

1. Elements of Law. — Origin, Nature, Sources 
and Development of Law. 

Text : Blackstone's Commentaries, Robinson's 
Elementary Law. 

Mr. Farry, Monday, 7:30-9:30 p. m. First Se- 
mester. 

2. Real Property. — Distinction between Real and 
Personal Property; Fixtures; Anglo-Saxon and Feudal 
Land Law ; Ownership ; Estates ; Rights in the Land of 
Others; Mortgages and other Liens upon Real Prop- 
erty; The Acquisition and Transfer of Real Property; 
Abstracts of Title; California Statutes and Cases. 

Mr. Farry, Monday, 7:30 — 9:30 p. m. First and 
Second Semester. 

Text: Burdick on Real Property; Burdick's Cases 
on Real Property. 

3. Contracts, Including Quasi-Contracts. — Nature 
of Contracts ; Parties ; Contracts distinguished from 
quasi-contracts; Nature of Quasi-Contracts; Offer and 
Acceptance; Agreement and Obligation; Consideration; 
Statute of Frauds; Illegality and Public Policy; Moral- 
ity; Misrepresentation; Mistake; Impossibility of Per- 
formance; Conflict of Laws; Construction and Waiver; 
Conditions and Warranties ; Performance ; Joint and 
Several Contracts; Contracts for the benefit of Third 
Persons ; Assignments ; Discharge ; Alteration ; Cancella- 



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St. Ignatius University 



tion; Release; Extinction. Mr. O'Gara, Tuesday, 
7:30—9:30 p. m. 

Text : Clark on Contracts ; Throckmorton's Cases 
on Contracts. 

4. Persons, Personal and Domestic Relations. — 
Husband and Wife; Parent and Child; Guardian and 
Ward ; Master and Servant ; Marriage ; Promise to 
Marry; Marriage Contract at Common Law and under 
California Statutes; Solemnization of Marriage; Prop- 
erty Rights of Husband and Wife; Status of Married 
Women ; Transactions between Spouses ; Torts of Hus- 
band or Wife; Separation; Divorce; -Custody, Services, 
and Earnings of Children; Rights of Children; Wrongs 
to Children ; Wrongs by Children ; Adoption ; Infancy ; 
Contracts by Infants; Obligations of Children; Guard- 
ian and Ward; Insanity; Growth in Importance of the 
Law of Master and Servant; Change in Relation be- 
tween Master and Servant produced by Economic De- 
velopments; Rights and Obligations of Master and 
Servant; Employers' Liability Acts. Mr. Breen, 
Thursday and Friday, 7:30 — 8:30 p. m. 

Text: Tiffany on Domestic Relations. Cooley's 
cases on Domestic Relations. 

5. Criminal Law. — History of Criminal Law ; 
Crimes and Punishments; Criminal Intent; Classifica- 
tion of Crimes ; Specific Crimes ; Criminal Procedure ; 
California Statute Law on the Subject. Mr. McKin- 
ley, Friday, 8:30 — 9:30 p. m. 

Text: Clark on Criminal Law. Mikell's Cases 
on Criminal Law. 



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45 



6. Mental Philosophy: Minor Logic. — Terms, 
mental and verbal. Definition. Division. Judgments 
and propositions. Reasoning and argumentation. De- 
ductive and inductive reasoning. Method. 

Major Logic. — Truth of thought. Various states 
of mind, such as ignorance, error, doubt, opinion and 
certitude. Scepticism. Trustworthiness of human tes- 
timony. Divine testimony or revelation. 

Ontology. — Reality and its transcendental attri- 
butes: unity, truth and goodness. Actual and possible 
being. Substance and accidents. Causality: material, 
formal, efficient and final. 

Cosmology. — Origin of the world. Its purpose and 
perfection. The laws of nature. Rev. Eugene S. 
Oliver, S. J., Thursday, 8:30 — 9:30 p. m. 

Text Book: Coppens' Logic and Mental Philoso- 
phy. 

Second Year 

1. Torts. — General Principles of the Law of Torts. 
Parties. Remedies. Damages. Particular Torts. False 
Imprisonment. Injuries to Family Relations. Defama- 
tion. Deceit. Malicious Wrongs. Conspiracy. Strikes 
and Boycotts. Trespass. Waste. Conversion. Nui- 
sance. Negligence. Hazardous Occupations. Con- 
flict of Laws. Workmen's Compensation. California 
Statutes and Decisions. Mr. Beretta, Thursday, 8:30 
—9:30 p. m. 



Text: Hale on Torts. Chase's Cases on Torts. 



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St. Ignatius University 



2. Sales. — Formation of the Contract; What may 
be sold; Statute of Frauds; Effect of the Contract in 
Passing the Property; Conditional Sales; Reservation 
of Right of Possession of Property; Fraud and Re- 
tention of Possession; Illegality; Conditions and War- 
ranties ; Performance of Contract ; Rights of Unpaid 
Seller against the Goods ; Actions for Breach of the 
Contract. 

Text: Tiffany on Sales. 

Cases : Cooley's Cases on Sales. 

Mr. Riley, Monday, 7:30—8:30 p. m. 

3. Agency. — Definitions and Distinctions ; For 
What Purposes Agency May Be Created; Who may be 
Principal or Agent; Ratification; Delegation of Au- 
thority ; Termination of the Agency ; Nature, Extent, 
Construction and Execution of the Authority. Duties 
and Liabilities (a) of Agent and Principal to each 
other; (b) of Agent and Third Person to each other; 
(c) of Principal and Third Person to each other; At- 
torney at Law, Auctioneers, Brokers, Factors. 

Text : Mechem's Outlines of Agency. 
Cases: Mechem's Cases on Agency. 
Mr. Riley, Monday, 8:30—9:30 p. m. 
First Semester. 

4. Partnership. — Definitions and Distinctions. For 
What Purposes a Partnership May Be Created ; Who 
May Be Partners ; Contract of Partnership and the 
Evidence Thereof ; What Acts and Contracts Create a 
Partnership ; Quasi-Partnerships ; Articles of Co- 
Partnership; Firm Name; Good Will; Capital of the 



The College of Law 



47 



Firm ; Property of the Firm ; Rights and Duties of 
Partners Toward Each Other; Actions Between 
Partners ; Powers of Partners ; Liability for Acts of a 
Partner, Agent and Servant; Nature and Extent of 
Partner's Liability ; Actions by and Against the 
Firm ; Termination of the Partnership ; Notice of Dis- 
solution; Lien of Partners; Application of Partnership 
Assets ; Final Accounting ; Special Partnerships. 

Text: Mechem's Elements of Partnership. 

Cases: Mechem's Cases on Partnership (third 
edition) . 

Mr. Riley, Monday, 8:30—9:30 p. m. Second 
Semester. 

5. Bailments and Carriers. — What is Bailment; 
Kinds of Bailments; Rights and Obligations of Bailor 
and Bailee; Definition of a Carrier; Relation of Carrier 
to the Public; Rights and Liabilities of Carriers; De- 
grees of Care ; Special Kinds of Carriers ; Innkeepers ; 
Warehousemen ; Safe Deposit Companies ; Telegraph 
Companies. Mr. Farry, Friday, 7:30 — 8:30 p. m. 

Text: Goddard on Bailments and Carriers. 
Green's Cases on Carriers. 

6. Bills and Notes. — The Law Merchant; Nego- 
tiable Instruments; Bills of Exchange; Bills of Lading; 
Notes; Checks; Endorsements; Rights and Obligations 
of Maker, Payee, Surety, and Guarantor; Presentment, 
Demand, Protest, Notice of Dishonor ; Bona Fides ; Con- 
sideration; Defense; California Statutes on Negotiable 
Instruments ; Statutes of Frauds ; Rights of a Surety as 
Distinguished from Those of his Principal ; Obligation of 



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St. Ignatius University 



a Surety; Subrogation; Indemnity; Contribution; Exon- 
eration. Mr. Farry, Tuesday, 7:30 — 9:30 p. m. 

Text: Norton on Bills and Notes; Moore's Cases 
on Bills and Notes. 

7. Mental Philosophy: Cosmology. — The constit- 
uent elements of matter. The general properties of 
bodies. Space and time. 

Psychology. — Life in general. Vegetative, sensi- 
tive and intellectual life. The spirituality and immor- 
tality of the human soul. Origin of species. 

Natural Theology. — The existence of God. Di- 
vine providence. Its compatibility with the existence 
of evil. Miracles ; their possibility and cognoscibility. 
Rev. Eugene S. Oliver, S. J., Thursday, 7:30 — 8:30 
p. m. 

Text: Coppens' Logic and Mental Philosophy. 
Third Year 

1. Private Corporations. — Nature and Classification 
of Corporations. Creation, Organization and Citizenship 
of Corporations. Promoters. Effect of Irregular In- 
corporation. The Corporation and the State — the Char- 
ter. Franchises and Privileges. Powers of Corpora- 
tions. The Doctrine of Ultra Vires and its Applica- 
tion. Liability of Corporations for Torts and Crimes. 
Capital Stock. Stock Subscriptions. Transfer of 
Shares. Membership in Corporations. Rights of Stock- 
holders. Corporate Meetings and Elections. Officers 
and Agents and the Management of Corporations. 
Common Law and Statutory Liability of Stockholders. 



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49 



Insolvency and Dissolution. Extra-territorial Powers 
of Corporations — State Control over Foreign Corpora- 
tions. California Statutes and Decisions on the Fore- 
going Topics. Mr. Beretta, Thursday, 7:30 — 8:30 
p. m. 

Text: Elliott on Private Corporations. Elliott- 
Wormser Cases on Private Corporations. 

2. Probate Law. — History of the Law of Wills and 
Successions ; Wills and Administrations ; The Making of 
Wills ; Revocation of Wills ; Formal Requisites ; Descent ; 
Gifts Causa Mortis ; Executors and Administrators, Their 
Rights, Powers and Duties; Payment of Legacies; Ac- 
counting; Distribution, and Partition. In the instruction 
on this subject particular attention will be paid to the 
California Statutes. Mr. Breen, Friday, 8:30 — 9:30 
p. m. 

Text: Ross on Probate. 2 Vols. 

3. Equity Jurisprudence. — Origin and Rise of the 
Courts of Equity and Extension of Equity Jurisdiction; 
Distinction Between Law and Equity; Jurisdiction and 
Procedure of Equity Courts; Equitable Remedies, Par- 
ticularly Specific Performance, Injunction and Account- 
ing; Trusts and Trustees; Subject of Trusts; Creation of 
Trusts ; Classification of Trusts ; Rights, Duties and Lia- 
bilities of Trustee and Cestui Que Trust; Execution of 
Trusts; Resignation or Removal of Trustees; The Doc- 
trine of Cy Pres ; California Law on the Subject. Equity 
Pleading will be more particularly treated in the course 



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St. Ignatius University 



on Pleading and Practice in the Fourth Year. Mr. 
McKinley, Friday, 7:30—8:30 p. m. 

Text : Eaton on Equity. Throckmorton's Cases 
on Equity. 

4. Constitutional Law. — History of the American 
Constitution ; Difference Between Federal and State Con- 
stitutions ; The Three Co-ordinate Branches of the Gov- 
ernment and Their Respective Rights and Relation to 
One Another ; Power of the Judiciary to Declare Uncon- 
stitutional Acts of the Legislative and Executive Branch- 
es ; Adoption and Amendment of Constitutions ; Con- 
struction of the Constitution; Equal Protection of the 
Laws ; Class Legislation ; Vested Rights ; Due Process 
of Law ; Police Power ; Eminent Domain ; Taxation ; Ex 
Post Facto Laws; Laws Impairing the Obligation of 
Contracts; Rights of Life, Liberty, Property and the 
Pursuit of Happiness; Religious Liberty and Freedom 
of Conscience; Civil Rights; Political Rights and Privi- 
leges and Their Protection; Protection of Persons Ac- 
cused of Crime; Searches and Seizures; Regulation of 
Commerce; Government of Territories; Jurisdiction of 
the Federal Courts. In this course a thorough study 
will be made of many of the leading decisions rendered 
by the United States Supreme Court. Mr. McKin- 
ley, Tuesday, 7:30 — 9:30 p. m. 

Text: Black's Constitutional Law. Hall's Cases 
on Constitutional Law. 

5. Moral Philosophy. — The science of ends. Al- 
lied sciences, Psychology and Political Philosophy. 
Divisions of end. Nature and effects of moral causa- 
tion. The Supreme Good: Must be attainable not 



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51 



here but hereafter. Moral good and moral evil : Their 
determinants. Responsibility and its modifiers. Merit, 
demerit. The Natural Law : Its knowableness and 
immutability. The moral faculty. Theories of Moral- 
ity. Pantheism, Materialism, Hedonism, Utilitarianism. 

The concept of right and duty. Elements of right. 
Division of rights and duties. Duties to God. Religion, 
natural and revealed. Worship, interior and exterior, 
individual and social. Duties to oneself. 

Intellectual and moral perfection. Preservation of 
life. Self-defense. Duties to fellow-men. Benevolence 
and beneficence, justice, distributive, legal, cumulative. 
Contracts. The right of private property. Testamen- 
tary right. Communism, Agrarian Socialism, the So- 
cial Democracy. Rev. James J. Hayes, S. J., Thursday, 
8:30—9:30 p. m. 

Text : Coppens, Ethics. 

Fourth Year. 

1. Municipal Corporations. — The Creation of Mu- 
nicipal Corporations; Legislative Control; Alteration 
and Dissolution; The Charter; Proceedings and Ordi- 
nances ; Officers, Agents and Employees ; Contracts ; 
Improvements; Police Powers and Regulations; 
Streets, Sewers, Parks and Public Buildings ; Torts ; 
Debts, Funds, Expenses and Administration; Taxa- 
tion ; Actions ; Quasi Corporations — Counties ; Quasi 
Corporations Other Than Counties. Mr. Riley, 
Thursday, 8:30 — 9:30 p. m. First Semester. 

Text: Cooley on Municipal Corporations. Cooley's 
Cases on Municipal Corporations. 



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St. Ignatius University 



2. Evidence. — Province of Judge and Jury ; Burden 
of Proof; Weight of Evidence; Foundations of Belief; 
Presumptions ; Judicial Notice ; Classification of Evi- 
dence; Hearsay; Parol and Written Evidence; Opinion 
Evidence; Admissions and Confessions; Competency of 
Witnesses; Privileges of Witnesses; Impeachment of 
Witnesses; The Art of Cross-Examination. Mr. 
O'Gara, Friday, 7:30 — 9:30 p. m. 

Text: McKelvey on Evidence. Throckmorton's 
Cases on Evidence. 

3. Pleading and Practice. — History and Jurisdic- 
tion of the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman Courts. 
The Common Law Courts. Pleading and Practice at 
Common Law. Special Pleading. Writs. Trials. Ver- 
dict and Judgment. New Trials. Origin and Jurisdic- 
tion of the Court of Equity. Pleading and Practice 
in Equity. The Decree. Organization and Jurisdiction 
of the Trial Courts in California. Pleading and Prac- 
tice Under the California Code of Civil Procedure. 
Successive Steps in an Action in the Trial Court from 
the Filing of the Complaint to the Entry of Judgment. 
Constructive Service of Process. Special Proceedings. 
Provisional Remedies. Supplementary Proceedings. 
New Trial and Appeal. California Cases. Practice in 
Federal Courts. Removal of Causes from State to 
Federal Courts. Writ of Error to Supreme Court of 
the United States. Mr. Beretta, Tuesday, 7:30—9:30 
p. m. 

Text : Phillips on Code Pleading. 

4. Extraordinary Remedies and Special Statutory 
Proceedings. — This course will consist of a full exposi- 



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53 



tion of the nature of such extraordinary remedies and 
statutory proceedings as Arrest and Bail, Claim and 
Delivery of Personal Property, Injunctions, Attachments, 
Proceedings Supplementary to Execution, Appointment 
of Receivers, Deposit in Court, Writs of Review, Man- 
date, Prohibition and Supersedeas, Confession of Judg- 
ment, Submitting a Controversy without action, Dis- 
charge of Persons Imprisoned on Civil Process, Sum- 
mary Proceedings for Obtaining Possession of Real 
Property; California Statute Law on these matters; 
Jurisdiction of the California Courts; Procedure. Mr. 
Riley, Thursday, 8:30 — 9:30 p. m. — Second Semester. 

No Text required. Code of Civil Procedure is 
used. 

5. Moral Philosophy: Society in general. — Origin, 
remote and proximate. Essential elements. The So- 
ciality of man. Divisions of society. 

Domestic Society. — Its origin, unity, indissolubil- 
ity, necessity. Source of its rights. Limits of its au- 
thority. The. family right of education. The State 
and education. 

Civil Society. — The origin of civil or social au- 
thority. Its ends, proximate and remote. Legislative, 
judicial, executive and coercive powers. Capital pun- 
ishment. Civil and political property right. Eminent 
domain. 

International society from the viewpoint of Nat- 
ural Law. Beneficence and benevolence between inde- 
pendent governments. Fidelity to treaties and alliances. 
The high seas and ownership. Freedom of commercial 



54 



St. Ignatius University 



relations. Defensive and offensive wars. Modern 
causes of wars. Intervention. The rights of neutrals. 
Rev. James J. Hayes, S. J., Thursday, 7:30 — 8:30 p. m. 

Text: Coppens, S. J., Ethics. 

6. Moot Court— A Moot Court is Part of the 
Regular Mode of Instruction in Pleading and Prac- 
tice. Attendance is Compulsory on Senior and Junior 
Students. The Proceedings are Conducted in the Man- 
ner Usual in the State Courts. A Calendar of Cases is 
Prepared with Facts, Parties and Counsel Assigned. 
A Judge is Designated to Sit in Each Case. Each Case 
involves the Preparation and Filing of Regular Plead- 
ings, Service and Return of Process, Arguments of 
Motions and Demurrers, Trial before the Court or a 
Jury, Examination of Witnesses, Introduction of Evi- 
dence, Argument and Submission of Cause, and Ver- 
dict and Judgment. A Court of Appeal Holds Ses- 
sions as Often as Business may Require. Mr. Beretta, 
Monday, 7:30—9:30 p. m. 

N. B. — Classes are held Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 
and Friday from 7:30 p. m. to 9:30 p. m. in the St. 
Ignatius University Building, 2211 Hayes St. For Reg- 
istration apply to the President or Vice-President at the 
University, 2211 Hayes street. 



The College of Lazv 



55 



DEBATING 

The Philalethic House for the First Year Students 
and the Philalethic Senate for those of the Second 
Year, organized along the lines of the Federal Congress, 
meet at 7 :30 p. m. on alternate Wednesdays. 

Questions of social, historical, civic and national in- 
terest are discussed in due form, and when passed by 
both bodies go up to the President of the University for 
his action. Practice in public speaking and in Parlia- 
mentary Law is thus acquired under the guidance of 
experienced directors. 

Attendance at the meetings is obligatory for First 
and Second Year Students and optional for those of 
the Third and Fourth Years. 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



58 



St. Ignatius University 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The following may enter the Freshman class in the 
College of Engineering: 

1. Students who have successfully completed the 
St. Ignatius High School course or the course of any 
other Standard High School; 

2. Students who have a thorough knowledge of 
English, Algebra, Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 
Free-hand and Instrumental Drawing and Lettering, 
and a facility to read and translate from any two of 
the following languages: Latin, Greek, French, Ger- 
man, Spanish, Italian. 

Schedule of subjects more fully outlined below. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 

1. Field Engineering 

2. Field Work and Map- 

ping 

3. Materials of Construc- 

tion 

4. Drawing 
Physics, 1. 
Mathematics, 1. 
Evidences of Religion, 1. 
English, 1 and 2. 
History, 1. 



Second Semester 

1. Field Engineering 

2. Field Work and Map- 

ping 

4. Drawing 

5. Descriptive Geometry 

6. Practical Astronomy 
Physics, 2. 

Evidences of Religion, 1. 
English, 3 and 4. 
History, 1. 



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59 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 

7. Field Engineering 

8. Mapping 

9. Geology 

10. Mineralogy 

11. Shades, Shadows and 

Perspective 
Mathematics, 2. 
Chemistry, 1 and 2. 
English, 5. 
History, 2. 



Second Semester 

7. Field Engineering 

8. Mapping 

9. Geology 

10. Mineralogy 

11. Shades, Shadows and 

Perspective 
Chemistry, 3 and 4. 
Evidences of Religion, 2. 
History, 2. 
English, 6 and 7. 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 

12. Strength of Materials 

14. Hydraulics 

15. Graphic Statics 

18. Electrical Machinery 

19. Electrical Machinery 

Laboratory 
Mathematics, 3. 
Physics, 3. 
Philosophy, 1 and 2. 
History, 3. 
Evidences, 3. 



Second Semester 

12. Strength of Materials 

13. Strength of Mat. Lab- 

oratory 

14. Hydraulics 

16. Framed Structures 

20. Heat Engineering 

21. Highway Engineering 
Physics, 4. 
Mathematics, 3. 
Evidences, 3. 
Economics, 1. 
Philosophy, 3 and 4. 



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St, Ignatius University 



SENIOR YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

17. Structures 17. Structures 

23. Least Squares 24. Geodesy 

25. Railroad Engineering 26. Foundations 

28. Water Supply Engi- 27. Masonry Structures 

neering 30. Sewer Systems 

29. Irrigation Engineering 31. Metallurgy of Iron and 
32. Engineering Jurispru- Steel; Assaying. 

dence Evidences, 4. 

Chemistry, 5. Economics, 2. 

Philosophy, 5 and 6. Philosophy, 7. 
History, 4. 
Evidences, 4. 

Summer Camp. For Freshman and Sophomore 
Students. Announcements are made at the close of 
the Second Semester. 

Thesis. All Senior Students must prepare an 
original written dissertation on an engineering sub- 
ject chosen by them. 

COURSES 
1. Field Engineering 

Plane Surveying: The construction, adjustments 
and use of surveying instruments ; and the methods em- 
ployed in topographic, city, mine and hydrographic 
surveys. 

Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 

Text : Breed & Hosmer, "The Principles and Prac- 
tice of Surveying. ,, 



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61 



2. Field Work and Mapping 

Manipulation and use of the chain, compass, tran- 
sit, level, and plane table. 

Manual: Pence & Ketchum, ''Surveying Manual.'' 

Office Work comprises calculation and plotting 
from field notes, making profiles, contour maps. 

(Field Practice or Office Work) Thursday after- 
noons and Saturday mornings. 

3. Materials of Construction 

Classification and properties of timber and the nat- 
ural stones; the manufacture, properties and structural 
adaptability of cement, brick, mortar, concrete, iron and 
steel, paints and plasters; fireproofing. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Johnson, "Trie Materials of Construction." 
4. Drawing 

Use of drawing instruments and materials, instru- 
mental constructions, projections, sketching, lettering, 
dimensioning and working methods. Tracing and blue 
printing. Three Periods. (Both Semesters.) 

Text: French, Engineering Drawing. 

5. Descriptive Geometry 

Problems involved in the orthogonal projection of 
points, straight lines, angles, planes and solid figures. 

Applications to engineering structures. 

Text: C. L. Adams, Descriptive Geometry. Parts 
I and II. 

Lectures and drafting practice. Six Periods. (Sec- 
ond Semester.) 



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St. Ignatius University 



6. Practical Astronomy 

Astronomical observations needed in the practice 
of the surveyor. Special problems in the field with the 
engineer's transit for latitude, longitude, time and 
azimuth. 

One Period. (Second Semester.) 
Text : Hosmer ; Azimuth. 

7. Field Engineering 

1. Railway, Highway, and Canal Surveying. 
Reconnaissance, preliminary and location surveying, 

theory of railway curves simple, compound and transi- 
tion., earthwork computations, location of switches, side 
tracks and yards. 

Lectures and Problems. Six Periods. (Both Se- 
mesters.) 

Text : Allen's, R. R. Curves and Earthwork ; Al- 
len's, Field and Office Tables. 

2. Surveying. Field Practice: An application of 
the principles of the lecture course. (Thursday after- 
noons, Saturday mornings.) 

8. Mapping 

Plotting, topographic drawing, profile drawing, mass 
diagram, railway drafting. Three Periods. (Both Se- 
mesters.) 

Text: Daniels' Topographical Drawing. 

9. Geology 

A general course in dynamical, structural, and his- 
torical Geology. 

Text: Chamberlain & Salisbury, College Geology. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 



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63 



10. Mineralogy 

Laboratory exercises in the determination of min- 
erals by their physical and chemical properties. 

A short series of lectures is given on Crystallog- 
raphy. 

Manuals: Eakle, Mineral Tables. J. V. Lewis, 
Determinative Mineralogy. 

Three Periods. (Both Semesters.) 

11. Shades, Shadows and Perspective 

Descriptive Geometry as applied to shades and 
shadows. The principles of Perspective. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. 
Drawing. Four Periods. (Both Semesters.) 
Text: J. E. Hill, Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 

12. Strength of Materials 

A thorough course in the Applied Mechanics of 
Solids, Strength of Materials under simple stress; ten- 
sile, shearing and compressional. Reactions of supports, 
external shear and bending moment, neutral surface, 
line and axis, fibre stress. Beams and their formulas, 
flexure and tension, flexure and compression. 

Columns, Rankin's and Euler's formulas. Strength 
of Shafts, torsional stress, transmission of power, tem- 
perature stress. 

Riveted Joints. 

Text: Strength of Materials, Boyd. 
Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 



64 



St. Ignatius University 



13. Strength of Materials (Laboratory) 

Tests of cement, concrete, wood, iron and steel in 
tension, compression, shear, bending and torsion. One 
period. (4 hours.) (Second Semester.) 

Manual: Laboratory. Manual for Testing. Ma- 
terials of Construction, Waterbury. 

14. Hydraulics 

A thorough course in the applied mechanics of 
liquids, static pressure of water, bursting pressure, 
longitudinal stress, center of pressure, buoyance, flow 
of water through orifices, over weirs and through pipes, 
friction loss, loss of water in open channels, measure- 
ment of flow in streams, dynamic action of jets and 
streams. 

Text: Russell, Text Book on Hydraulics. 
Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 

15. Graphic Statics 

Graphic analysis of the resolution and composition 
of forces in equilibrium, and applications to the analysis 
of stresses in engineering structures with respect to 
both their dead and live loads. 

Lectures and recitations. One Period. (First 
Semester.) 

Drafting. Three Periods. (First Semester.) 
Text: Influence Lines for Bridges and Roofs, 
Burr and Falk. 



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65 



16. Framed Structures 

Application of analytical statics to the physical an- 
alysis and elemental designing of roof and bridge trusses 
and building frames. 

Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: The Theory of Structures, Spofford. 

17. Framed Structures 

A continuation of course 16. 

Computation of stresses and design of structures of 
wood, steel and masonry. 

Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 

Text: As in (16). 

18. Electrical Machinery 

The study of the magnetic field, electro-magnetic 
induction, types and characteristics of dynamos and 
motors. Transmission and distribution of current. Ele- 
ments of A. C. transformers. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Timbie, Elements of Electricity. 

19. Electrical Machinery (Laboratory) 

Laboratory exercises in the study of electrical meas- 
urements and the operation of ordinary types of electri- 
cal machinery. 

Manual: Clewell, Laboratory Manual: Direct and 
Alternating Current. One Period. (4 hours.) (First 
Semester.) 



66 



St. Ignatius University 



20. Heat Engineering 

Thermodynamics, steam boilers, power plant acces- 
sories, steam engines, valve-gearing. 

Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: Elements of Heat-Power Engineering. 
Hirschfeldt & Barnard. 

21. Highway Engineering 

The design, construction and maintenance of street 
pavements, sidewalks and roadways. Investigation of 
properties of road materials. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text : Highway Engineering, Blanchard & Drowne. 

22. Analytical Mechanics. 

An anvanced mathematical course on the kinemat- 
ics, dynamics and statics of material particles and rigid 
bodies. Kinematics of a point moving rectilinearly 
or curvilinearly, and of a body moving transitionally, 
rotationally or with an uniplanar motion. Dynamics 
of a point ; work, energy, impulse, kinetic and poten- 
tial energies, moment and moment of inertia-dynamics 
of a rigid body. Statics, conditions for equilibrium, 
application to flexible cords. 

Lectures and recitations. Five Periods. (Both 
Semesters.) 

Text: Theoretical Mechanics, Smith & Longley. 
Technical Mechanics, Maurer. 



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67 



23. Method of Least Squares 

Nature of method and application to engineering 
problems. 

Lectures and recitations. Two periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Merriman, The Method of Least Squares. 

24. Geodesy and Field Astronomy 

Method of measurement of a base line and instru- 
ments employed, methods of measurement of the angles 
and instruments employed, adjustment of the measured 
angles, adjustment of quadrilateral and of larger sys- 
tems, methods of determining latitude and azimuth, 
determination of longitude and time, geodetical leveling 
trigonometrically and with a precise spirit-level. 

Lectures and recitations. Two periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: Precise Surveying and Goedesy, Merriman. 

25. Railroad Engineering 

Railroad grading, track laying and tunneling, tres- 
tles and culverts, alterations, improvements, rolling 
stock, dispatching and signaling. 

Lectures and recitations. Two periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Raymond, Railroad Engineering. 

26. Foundations 

Methods of constructing foundations on land and 
water. 

Text: As in (27). 



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St. Ignatius University 



27. Masonry Structures 

The design and construction of dams, retaining 
walls, piers and bridges. 

Lectures and recitations. Three Periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: Baker's Treatise on Masonry Construction. 

28. Water Supply Engineering 

The design and construction of reservoirs, earth 
and timber dams, filtration plants, tanks and water 
distribution systems. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Folwell, Water-Supply Engineering, 

29. Irrigation Engineering 

The location, design and construction of irriga- 
tion systems, and their appurtenances. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Newell and Murphy, Principles of Irriga- 
tion Engineering. 

30. Sewer Systems 

The design and construction of sanitary, storm 
and combined sewers and septic tanks, chemical treat- 
ment and disposal of sewage. 

Lectures and recitations. Two Periods. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: Folwell, Sewerage. 



The College of Engineering 



69 



31. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel 

Manufacture of Pig Iron; its purification, manu- 
facture of Wrought Iron and Crucible Steel, the Besse- 
mer process ; the Open Hearth process, defects in 
ingots; mechanical treatment of steel, iron and steel 
founding; solution theory of iron and steel, constitu- 
tion of steel and cast iron; heat treatment of steel; 
alloy steel; corrosion of iron and steel, electrometallurgy 
and metallography of iron and steel. 

Lectures and recitations. One Period. (Second 
Semester.) 

Text: The Metallurgy of Iron and Steel, Stough- 

ton. 

32. Engineering Jurisprudence 

General legal aspect of engineering construction, 
relation of engineer to contractor, contract specifica- 
tions, forms of proposal, guaranty and indemnity bonds. 

Lectures and recitations. One Period. (First 
Semester.) 

Text: Kirby, Elements of Specification Writing. 



9 



THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 



72 



St. Ignatius University 



THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

For admission to this course applicants must 
show credentials of having completed successfully, 
(1) A standard four years' High School course, and 
also (2) The further study of the subjects as out- 
lined in the Freshman and Sophomore classes of the 
College of Arts, Science and Philosophy of this Uni- 
versity. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS 
First Year 

Junior Class of Letters, Science and Philosophy. 
FIRST SEMESTER 

1. Philosophy of Religion. 

2. Mental Philosophy. 

3. Chemistry (Course 6). 

4. Physics (Course 3). 

5. Biology. The biological unit, the cell ; morphol- 
ogy of the cell, physical and chemical features 
of Protoplasm and Nucleus; metabolism; physiol- 
ogy of the cell ; cell-division and its kinds, direct 
or amitotic division, indirect division or karyo- 
kinesis. Difference between plant and animal 
life; anatomy and life history of Ancoela, Hae- 
matococcus, Heteromita, Euglena, Protomyxa, 
Mycetozoa. Origin of Life, Biogenesis and 



The l } re-Mcdical Course 



Abiogenesis ; Parasitism ; Sexual and Asexual 
reproduction. Origin of Species, Evolution ; di- 
vergence of character; variability and heredity. 
Spermatogenesis and Oogenesis ; somatic and 
germ-cells; maturation-division. Main classifica- 
tions of Animal Kingdom ; anatomy of Crayfish 
and Dogfish with dissection. Main classifica- 
tions of Vegetable Kingdom ; Dimorphism of 
plants ; Gymosperms and Agiosperms. 
Lecture and Quiz : Three periods. 

6. Histology. General Histology; minute structure 
of cells. Histological technique ; use of Micro- 
scope and Microtome; freezing Microtome; tech- 
nique of embedding in Paraffine and Celloidin; 
technique of Staining Slides ; technique of Serial 
Sections; Principles of Brown's reproductive 
technique. 

Laboratory: Two periods. 

7. Chemistry. Course 6. Organic. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

1. Philosophy of Religion. 

2. Mental Philosophy. 

3. Chemistry (Courses 6 and 7). 

4. Physics (Course 4). 

5. Embryology. Embryology in general; somatic 
and germ-cells ; maturation-division ; maturation 
of ovum-cell and sperm-cell; fertilization of 
ovum; implantation and nutrition of embryo; 



74 St, Ignatius University 

formation of placenta, heredity. Special Em- 
bryology; development mode of different organs 
in human body. 

Laboratory: Three periods. 

6. Special Histology. Histological structure of or- ! 
gans of the human body ; of the sense organs ; 
eye, ear, taste, smell and touch. Histology of 
fundamental tissues. 

Laboratory: Two periods. 

7. Chemistry. Courses 6 and 7. 

Second Year 

Senior Class of the College of Arts, Science and 
Philosophy 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1. Philosophy of Religion. 

2. Moral and Mental Philosophy. 

3. Chemistry (Course 8). 

4. Physics (Course 5). 

5. Physiology. 

I. Muscle and Nerve 

(a) Phenomenon of Contraction. 

(b) Chemical Composition of Muscle. 
Chemical Changes of Contraction. 
Chemical Changes of Rigor Mortis. 

(c) Phenomenon of Conduction. 
Properties of Nerve Fibres. 



The Pre-Medical Course 



75 



(d) Electional Phenomena Shown by Nerve and 

Muscle. 

(e) Nature of Nerve Impulse. 
Nutrition of Nerve Fibres and Cells. 

II. Blood and Lymph 

(a) General Properties of Blood. 
Physiology of the Corpuscles. 

(b) Chemical Composition of the Blood Plasma; 
Coagulation; Quantity of the Blood; Regen- 
eration after Hemorrhage. 

(c) Composition and Formation of Lymph. 

III. The Organs of Circulation 
of the Blood and Lymph 

(a) Velocity and Pressure of Blood Flow. 

(b) Physical Factors Concerned in the Produc- 
tion of Blood-Pressure and Blood-Velocity. 

(c) The Pulse. 

(d) The Heart-Beat. 

(e) Cause and Sequence of the Heart-Beat; Prop- 
erties of Heart-Muscle. 

(f) The Cardiac Nerves and Their Physiological 
Actions. 

(g) Rate of Heart-Beat; Its Variations under 
Normal Conditions. 

(h) The Vasomotor Nerves and Their Physiologi- 
cal Activity. 

(i) The Vasomotor Supply of the Different Or- 
gans. 



St. Ignatius University 



IV. Respiration 

(a) Organs of External Respiration and the Res- 
piratory Movements. 

(b) Pressure Conditions in the Lungs and Thorax 
and Their Influence upon the Circulation. 

(c) Chemical and Physical Changes in the Air 
and the Blood Caused by Respiration. 

V. Digestion and Secretion 

(a) Movements of Alimentary Canal. 

(b) Composition of Foods and the Action of 
Enzymes. 

(c) The Salivary Glands; their Digestive Actions. 

(d) Digestion and Absorption in Stomach. 

(e) Digestion and Absorption in Intestines. 

(f) Physiology of the Liver and Spleen. 

(g) Physiology of the Pancreas. 

(h) The Kidneys and Skin as Excretory Organs. 

(i) Secretions of the Ductless Glands. Internal 
Secretions. 

VI. Nutrition and Heat Production 
and Regulation 

(a) General Methods. 

(b) History of the Protein Food. 

(c) Nutritive History of Carbohydrates and Fats. 

(d) Nutritive Value of the Inorganic Salts and 
the Accessory Articles of Diet. 

(e) Effect of Muscular Work and Temperature on 
Body Metabolism; Heat Energy of Foods; 
Dietetics. 



The Pre-Medical Course 



77 



(f) Production of Heat in the Body; Its Meas- 
urements and Regulation ; Body Temperature ; 
Calorimetry; Physiological Oxidations. 

Lecture and Laboratory: Five periods. 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

1. Philosophy of Religion. 

2. Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

3. Chemistry (Course 8). 

4. Physics (Course 5). 

5. Bacteriology. History of Bacteriology. Classifi- 
cation of Bacteria, Anaerobic. Conditions of 
Life; Pathogenic and Apathogenic Bacteria; 
Study of Apathogenic Bacteria with Slide and by 
Culture. 

Laboratory: Three periods. 

6. Physiology. (Concluded.) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Two periods. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



/ 



80 



St. Ignatius University 



Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The object of this Sodality is to foster among the 
students a spirit of love and devotion toward the Virgin 
Mother of God, and of virtue and piety among its mem- 
bers. 

St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society 

The principal object of this Society is to add solem- 
nity to Divine Worship by an accurate observance of its 
rites and ceremonies. It also affords Catholic students, 
distinguished for good deportment, the honor of serving 
in the sanctuary. 

The Apostleship of Study 

The object of this Association is to cultivate in the 
hearts of our students a love for the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus, a love for the Pope, a love for the Church, a 
love for our Holy Religion, and a love of that study and 
training which are to make the students of Catholic 
schools ornaments to their Religion and Country, and 
Apostles to their Fellows. 

The Alumni Society 

The object of this Society is to preserve and foster 
union among the Alumni and love for their Alma Mater. 

The Debating Society 

The aim of this organization is to foster a taste for 
public speaking among its members, to afford them an 
opportunity of applying sound principles to social and 



Student Organizations 



81 



historical questions and of mastering parliamentary law. 
This society is divided into three branches — the Phil- 
alethic (House and Senate), the Senior Philhistorian 
and the Junior Philhistorian. 

The Ignatian 

The Ignatian is the student quarterly of St. 
Ignatius, and its staff is made up of students who edit 
and publish the magazine. Its object is to make writers. 

The Dramatic Society 

The purpose of this Society is to cultivate a taste 
for the great masters of the drama and acquire that 
finish in elocution which comes from acting. 

The Orchestra and Brass Band 

Students are afforded by these Societies an oppor- 
tunity to improve themselves in music. 

The Library Association 

This Association is intended to form a taste for 
good reading. 

The Student Body Association 

This Society takes charge of the athletic activities 
of the students. 



82 



St. Ignatius University 



OFFICERS 

SENIOR SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

Director Rev. James J. Hayes, S. J. 

Prefect Raymond D. Williamson 

First Assistant Melvyn I. Cronin 

Second Assistant Sigmund J. Janas 

Sacristan Charles F. Sweigert 

{' William D. O'Connell 
John C. Hughes 
Edwin L. Harris 
Carroll M. O'Sullivan 
Raymond S. Burns 



JUNIOR SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

Director Arthur V. Coghlan, S. J. 

defect Edward P. Muller 

First Assistant John F. Larney 

Second Assistant Joseph A. Savage 

Secretary Albert D. Ragan 

(Horace Dibert 
) James J. Cantlen 

Marshals <Norbert W. Feely 

J Raymond S. Egan 
^Raymond S. Burns 



Stud en t Organizations 



83 



THE SANCTUARY SOCIETY 

Director Austin T. Howard, S. J. 

Prefect Alfred J. Abrahamsen 

First Assistant Prefect Francis A. King 

Second Assistant Prefect Vincent A. McGuire 

Secretary Norbert W. Feely 

Treasurer William T. Sweigert 

Censor Edmund I. Slater 

Vestry Prefect George E. Devine 

Vestry Prefect Robert V. Fulton 

APOSTLESHIP OF PRAYER 

Director Rev. James J. Hayes, S. J. 

Promoters. 

Julius J. Lister Raymond S. Egan 

Frank J. Clarke Charles R. Boden 

Frank T. McGrath George E. Devine 

Alfred J. Abrahamsen Martin H. O'Brien 

Edward S. Fitzpatrick Raymond S. Burns 

Gerald X. Sullivan Gerald G. Cleary 

Frank A. King Carroll M. O'Sullivan 

George A. Uhl James A. Corbett 

John F. Larney John T. Curran 

Joseph A. Savage Joseph A. Corbett 

John L. Mackall William S. Rice 

Leland F. Healy Jacob G. Muller 

Thomas S. King Mayo J. Brolan 

Patrick H. McCarthy Jr. George C. Melvin 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Moderator Rev. John J. Cunningham, S. J. 

President Joseph A. Murphy 

Vice-President Leo C. Lennon 

5 Henry P. Bowie 
Alfred R. Kelly 
Luke J Flynn tHCk 
Robert X. Ryan 
C. Harold Caulfield 

Secretary Raymond T. Feely 

Treasurer Robert K. White 

'William P. Golden 
i James J. Harrington 
J Edward P. Luby 
/Charles P. Knights 
Executive Committee Warren W. Brown 

'Dr. Louis X. Ryan 
{ J. Raleigh Kelly 
Eustace Cullinan 



84 



St. Ignatius University 



THE PHILALETHIC HOUSE 



President Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

Vice-President Melvyn I. Cronin 

Secretary Vincent W. Hallinan 

Treasurer James F. Donahue 

Censor Aubrey D. Duncan 

Librarian Joseph W. Giannini 



THE PHILALETHIC SENATE 

President Rev. Eugene S. Oliver, S. J. 

Vice-President Edmund J. Holl 

Secretary..... Fred T. Leo 

Treasurer. Joseph F. O'Malley 

Censor.... Louis Borello 

Librarian William W. Murphy 



SENIOR PHILHISTORIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 
First Semester 



President Rev. Joseph T. Morton, S. J. 

Vice-President Lawrence J. Davey 

Secretary Mark L. Devine 

Treasurer Frank T. McGrath 

Sergeant-at-Arms J. Victor Clarke 

Second Semester 

President Rev. Joseph T. Morton, S. J. 

Vice-President William T. Sweigert 

Secretary Alfred J. Abrahamsen 

Treasurer Frank T. McGrath 

Sergeant-at-Arms Nicholas B. Maroevich 



Student Organizations 



85 



JUNIOR PHILHISTORIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 



President Aloysius M. Torre, S. J. 

Vice-President Gerald X. Sullivan 

Recording Secretary Norbert H. Francis 

Corresponding Secretary Edward J. Varni 

Treasurer Leo F. Boyle 

Sergeant-at-Arms Howard J. Born 

Reporter Norbert W. Feely 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

(High School) 

First Semester 



Moderator Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

President Leo F. Boyle 

Vice-President Frank J. Ragan 

Secretary Eugene L. O'Meara 

Treasurer Elton A. Kane 

Yell Leader Francis A. King 



Second Semester 

Moderator Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

President Alex. J. Young 

Vice-President James R. Duffy 

Secretary Norbert W. Feely 

Treasurer Leo F. Boyle 

Yell Leader Edward J. Varni 

Athletic Manager Alex. J. Young 

Assistant Athletic Manager Eugene L. O'Meara 



THE STUDENT BODY ASSOCIATION 



Moderator Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

President Ivan N. Maroevich 

Vice-President William D. O'Connell 

Secretary Vincent W. Hallinan 

Treasurer Melvyn I. Cronin 

Football Manager Lawrence J. Davey 

Basketball Manager William N. Thorpe 



86 St. Ignatius University 



THE IGNATIAN 

First Semester 

Director .Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

Editor-in-Chief Vincent W. Hallinan 

Associate Editors { j^XnT. ^rSli 

Alumni William D. O'Connell 

Law W. Hall Evans 

University Notes William T. Sweigert 

University Athletics Melvyn I. Cronin 

High School Athletics Norbert W. Feely 

Business Manager Ivan N. Maroevich 

( Edward I. Fitzpatrick 
Assistant Business Managers < Mark A. Devine 

( Charles R. Boden 

Second Semester 

Director Edwin A. McFadden, S. J. 

Editor-inChief Vincent W. Hallinan 

\ Lawrence J. Davey 
Associate Editors /Jordan L. Martinelli 

/William N. Thorpe 

Alumni William D. O'Connell 

Law Ivan N. Maroevich 

University Notes William T. Sweigert 

University Athletics Melvyn I. Cronin 

High School Athletics Norbert W. Feely 

Business Manager Edward I. Fitzpatrick 

Assistant Business Managers { Norbert^ W .^Francis 



THE DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

Director Arthur V. Coghlan, S. J. 

President Thomas H. Foster 

Vice-President Peter J. McHugh 

Secretary Lawrence Davey 

Treasurer Alex. J. Young 

Business Manager William T. Sweigert 

Stage Manager Sig. J. Janas 

Publicity Manager Edward I. Fitzpatrick 



Student Organizations 



87 



THE BRASS BAND 



President Rev. John J. Cunningham, S. J. 

Leader Mr. Austin M. Morris 

Secretary Gerald Kane 

Treasurer Carroll M. O'Sullivan 

Music Keeper Daniel Mullins 



THE ORCHESTRA 

President Rev. John J. Cunningham, S. J. 

Vice-President Arthur V. Coghlan, S. J. 

Director Mr. Albert H. Schuh 

Secretary Francis B. Lessmann 

Treasurer Oliver Austin 

Music Keeper Julius Lister 



88 



St. Ignatius University 



A. M. D. G. 

THE UNIVERSITY AND HIGH SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1918-1919 

Saturday is the weekly holiday. 
1918 

Aug. 1-3 Registration of New Students. Ex- 
amination of Entering and Condi- 
tioned Students. 

Thur., Aug. 1 Examination in English Composition, 
Grammar and History. 

Fri., Aug. 2 Examination in Modern Languages, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science 
and Christian Doctrine. 

Sat., Aug. 3 Examination in Latin, Greek, Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Mon., Aug. 5 Instruction begins in High School and 
College Classes at 9:00 A. M. 
Schola Brevis. 
Law School Lectures Inaugurated at 
7:30 P. M. 

Mon., Aug. 12 Mass of the Holy Ghost. "Hall"; 

Reading of Rules and Announce- 
ments. Vacation after "Hall." 

Thur., Aug. IS Feast of the Assumption. Vacation. 

Mon., Aug. 19 Weekly Instruction in Christian Doc- 
trine begins. 

Wed., Aug. 21 The Philalethic House and Senate of 
the Law School reassemble. 

Thur., Aug. 22 The Senior Sodality, Senior Philhis- 
torian Debating Society meet. 



Calendar 



89 



Fri., Aug. 23 The Junior Sodality and the Junior 
Philhistorian Debating Society re- 
assemble. 

Mon., Sept. 2 Labor Day. Vacation. 

Mon., Sept. 9 Admission Day. Vacation. 

Wed., Oct. 16 Annual Retreat begins. 

Fri., Nov. 1 Feast of All Saints. Vacation. 

Mon., Nov. 4 Annual Requiem Mass for Deceased 
j Professors and Students of St. Ig- 
natius High School and University. 

Thur., Nov. 28 Thanksgiving Day. Vacation. 

Mon., Dec. 2 Repetitions begin in all Departments 
except Law. 

Mon., Dec. 9 Repetitions begin in Law Department. 
Tues., Dec. 17 Mid- Year Written Examinations be- 
gin in all Courses except Law. 
Sat., Dec. 21 Christmas Holidays begin. 

1919 

Fri., Jan. 3 Instruction resumed in all Depart- 
ments. Schola Brevis in day school 
course. Written Mid- Year Exam- 
inations begin in Law School., Sub- 
jects for extra Prize Work an- 
nounced. 

Fri., Jan. 17 Entries for Extra Prize Work close. 
Wed., Jan. 30 Vacation for College Sophomore and 

Freshman classes in honor of St. 

John Chrysostom. 
Wed., Feb. 12 Lincoln's Birthday. Vacation. 
Tues., Mar. 4 Shrove Tuesday. Vacation after 

Solemn High Mass. 
Thur., Mar. 6 Elocution Contest in High School. 



90 




57. Ignatius University 


1 nur., 


A/Tar 


13 


Oratorical Contest in University. 


ivion., 


A/To r 

iviar. 


17 


Feast of St. Patrick. Vacation. 


Thur., 


Apr. 


3 


Junior Philhistorian Prize Debate. 


Thur., 


A -rvt* 

/\pr. 


10 


Senior Philhistorian Prize Debate. 


VV C(i., 




16 


Easter Vacations begin. 


lvion., 


A Tkf 


21 


Examinations to remove conditions in 








Law School. 


11 1 PC 

J. UCo., 


A nr 

ix. Ul . 


22 


Instruction in all Departments re- 








sumed. 


i nur., 


Apr. 


24 


Philalethic House and Senate Prize 






Debate. 




iv±dy 


1 


May Day. Vacation. 


r n., 


iv±dy 


2 


Repetitions begin. 


Wprl 

VV CU., 


ividy 


7 


Feast of the Patronage of St. Joseph. 








Vacation. 


Odl., 


ividy 


10 


President's Day. Vacation. 


VV cQ., 


lviay 


21 


Written examinations. 


1V1UI1., 


ivi dy 


26 


Oral examinations before the Faculty. 


vv eci., 


lviay 


28 


High School Commencement. 


-Til., 


ividy 


30 


Memorial Day. Vacation. 


Tues., 


TiiriP 


3 


University Commencement. 



Roster of Students 



91 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 
1917-1918 

Abrahamsen, Alfred J Engineering 

Barnett, Irving P Law 

Bohm, George M Law 

Borello, Louis Law 

Boyle, Terence J Law 

Breman, Aaron S Law 

Brennan, William J Law 

Brotherton, Robert E Law 

Brumfield, Edward H Law 

Burke, Walter A Law 

Burns, J. Joseph Engineering 

Cahill, Lawrence Law 

Cantlen, James S Letters and Science 

Casey, Gerard J Law 

Clarke, Francis J Letters and Science 

Clarke, J. Victor Letters and Science 

Collins, Carroll J Law 

Compagno, Vincent I Law 

Conlan, Charles L Law 

Conlan, John F Law 

Conlon, Edward A Law 

Cronin, Melvyn I Law 

Cunningham, Cedric D Law 

Cunningham, Harry J Law 

Curry, John F Law 

Daly, Darrell W Law 

Davey, Lawrence J Letters and Science 

Deering, Thomas S Special Law 



92 



St. Ignatius University 



Devine, Mark A Engineering 

Dibert, Horace A Letters and Science 

Dinan, William Y Letters and Science 

Dolan, John L Law 

Donahue, James I Law 

Duncan, Aubrey D I Law 

Durkin, G. Elmer Engineering 

Evans, W. Hall Law 

Fankhauser, William C Law 

Feehan, Charles J Law 

Fitzpatrick, Edward J Letters and Science 

Flood, Raymond P Law 

Foster, Thomas H Law 

Fraser, J. Miller Pre-Medical 

Giannini, Joseph F Law 

Goldman, Alexander L Law 

Gray, Edward M Law 

Gray, Alfred J Special Law 

Gray, Francis P Law 

Hallinan, Vincent W Law 

Handley, Edward D Law 

Handlos, Joseph A Law 

Halpin, Thomas J Letters and Science 

Harrigan, Francis J Law 

Haswell, C. W Law 

Healy, Arthur J Law 

Heaney, W. Vincent Engineering 

Heinz, George J .Law 

Holl, Edmund J Law 

Hearst, Arthur J Law 

Hughes, Francis P Letters and Science 



Roster of Students 



93 



Inukai, Yoshiko Pre-Medical 

Jacka, William W Law 

Janas, Sigmund J Letters and Science 

Jansing, John K. B Law 

Jorgensen, Mark T Law 

Joseph, Joe Law 

Kennedy, Frank T Law 

Kenney, John M Law 

Kidwell, J. Kenneth Letters and Science 

Kohls, Clara L Pre-Medical 

Kohls, Hedwig V Pre-Medical 

Kraus, Mark R Law 

Larrecou, Emil A Law 

Leipsic, Sylvain D Law 

Lenahan, Jack W Law 

Lennon, Henry B Engineering 

Leo, Frederick T Law 

Lister, Julius J Pre-Medical 

Lyons, Daniel J Law 

Madden, Joseph A Engineering 

Maguire, Robert W. J Special Law 

Maroevich, Ivan N Law 

Maroevich, Nicholas B Letters and Science 

Martinelli, Jordan L Law 

Mayle, R. J Law 

Meherin, J. Vincent Law 

Miller, Albert W Law 

Miller, R. Paul Law 

Molkenbuhr, M. Edward Law 

Morris, James L Law 



94 



St. Ignatius University 



Morris, Austin M Law 

Muhlberger, Carl Law 

Murphy, William W Law 

McCann, William E Law 

McEntee, James J Law 

McFeeley, John H Law 

McGrath, Frank T Letters and Science 

McGrath, Thomas R Law 

McGranaghan, John J Law 

McHugh, Peter J Law 

Mclnerney, James T Law 

McLaughlin, Charles P Law 

McLaughlin, Joseph E Letters and Science 

McNicholas, Patrick J Law 

Naumann, Francis J Law 

Nolan, Clifford V Law 

Ohlandt, Chester Letters and Science 

Ohnimus, Arthur A Law 

O'Brien, J. Paul Law 

O'Brien, Paul P Law 

O'Connell, William D Letters and Science 

O'Connor, Walter J Law 

O'Leary, Francis Special Law 

O'Malley, Joseph F Law 

O'Neill, Harold J Law 

Peralta, Jose Law 

Presho, William J Law 

Pritchard, Joseph L Law 



Roster of Students 



95 



Rawson, Edwin L Law 

Riordan, Michael : Law 

Riccardi, Antoinette A Pre-Medical 

Ross, Charles E Law 

Ryan, Thomas E Law 

Savage, John J Engineering 

Sharkey, Edward Law 

Slevin, Thomas W Law 

Smith, W. Burr Science 

Sullivan, Thomas W Law 

Sweigert, William T Letters and Science 

Taheny, John J Law 

Taugher, Louis Law 

Thorpe, William N Law 

Thynnes, Louis C Law 

Toledo, Domingo G Pre-Medical 

Traverso, William Law 

van der Zee, Herman A Law 

Vizzard, James L , Law 

Wagner, Carl E Law 

Wall, James P Law 

Walsh. Lawrence F Law 

Welch, Joseph W Law 

Welch, Martin F Law 

Whelan, Thomas E Law 

White, Robert K Law 

Williamson, Raymond D Law 

Wing, Chan C Law 

Wiseman, Charles J Law 

Wurthman, George Special Law 



96 St. Ignatius University 

ALUMNI 



MASTERS OF ARTS 



Alexander A. O'Neil, M. D.1867 
Francis J. Leonard, S. J... 1868 
Hon. Jeremiah F. Sullivan, 

LL. B 1872 

Robert P. Tobin 1873 

Thomas H. Griffin 1874 

Thomas D. Riordan 1874 

James I. Boland, LL. B 1876 

John T. Fogarty 1876 

William I. Foley 1877 

Peter F. Dunne, LL. B 1878 

Gustave Mahe\ Jr., M. D..1878 
♦Francis C. Cleary, LL. B..1880 
*Rev. Henry D. Whittle, 

S. J 1880 

Joseph J. Dunne, LL. B...1880 

Henry F. Price 1881 

Joseph F. Bluxome, LL. B.1884 

Charles B. Lastreto 1886 

Rev. Joseph M. Gleason 1888 

Thaddeus E. Pawlicki, 

LL. B 1892 

Richard V. Curtis, LL. B...1892 
George A. Connolly, LL. B..1902 

John L. Mulrenin 1903 

Francis L. Fenton, LL. B...1908 



William A. Breen, LL. B...1905 

Edward A. Foley, LL. B 1905 

William J. Kieferdorf, A. B..1905 

E. Owen McCann, M. E 1905 

Stanislaus A. Riley, LL. B..1905 
Thomas W. Hickey, LL. B..1907 
Eustace Cullinan, A. B., 

LL. B 1907 

Edward F. O'Day 1907 

Francis I. Barrett, LL. B...1907 

Michael F. Nakamura 1907 

Benjamin L. McKinley, 

LL. B 1908 

Louis X. Ryan, M. D 1909 

David A. O'Keeffe 1910 

Joseph L. Sweeney 1910 

Charles C. Mohun, M. D 1911 

Leo J. Flanagan, M. D 1912 

William E. McCann 1912 

Rafael G. Dufficy, M. D., 

Capt U. S. A .....1912 

Francis P. Buckley 1913 

Wen singer F. Mahoney, 

U. S. A 1914 

Raymond T. Feely 1916 

Francis B. Lessmann, A. B., 

B. S., U. S. A 1917 



BACHELORS OF ARTS 



Augustus J. Bowie... 1863 

Henry P. Bowie 1865 

Francis J. Leonard, S. J 1865 

Alexander A. O'Neil, M. D.1865 
George E. F. Harrison, Col. 

U. S. A 1869 

Hon. Jeremiah F. Sullivan, 

LL. B 1870 

John A. Hicks 1871 

James H. Ryan 1871 

Robert P. Tobin 1872 

* cum laude. 



Thomas H. Griffin 1873 

Thomas D. Riordan 1873 

Rev. Julius J. Von Egloff- 

stein, S. J 1874 

James I. Boland, LL. B 1875 

John T. Fogarty 1875 

Alfred R. Kelly 1875 

Florence J. McAuliffe 1875 

Michael F. O'Connor 1875 

Joseph Pescia, M. D 1875 

Matthew I. Sullivan, LL. B.1876 



Alumni 



Alfred R. Tobin 1876 

Thomas Boland, S. J 1876 

William I. Foley 1876 

Peter F. Dunne, LL. B 1877 

Gustave Mane, Jr., M. D...1877 

Henry I. Blaney 1878 

William L. Whelan 1878 

Albert M. Whittle 1878 

Rev. Henry D. Whittle, S. J.1879 
Francis C. Cleary, LL. B...1879 

Joseph J. Dunne, LL. B 1879 

Henry F. Price 1879 

William T. Kearns 1881 

Joseph Hughes 1881 

*George J. Duraind 1881 

Edmund W. Marks 1881 

Hon. Jas. D. Phelan, LL. B.1881 

Augustine Casserly 1881 

John J. Dillon 1882 

* James I. Egan 1882 

John F. Brooke 1882 

John B. Casserly, LL. B 1882 

William J. Sweigert, LL. B.1883 

Thomas F. Connolly 1884 

Charles H. McKinstry, Brig- 
adier General, Eng. Corps., 

U. S. A 1884 

Charles B. Lastreto 1885 

Robert J. O'Connell, M. D..1885 
Clarence J. McKinstry. LL. 

B 1886 

Andrew Carrigan 1886 

James F. Leddy 1887 

Michael A. O'Dea 1887 

Joseph S. Tobin, LL. B 1887 

Rev. Joseph M. Gleason 1887 

Henry A. Tobin 1888 

John F. Campbell 1888 

Louis De F. Bartlett, Ph. B.1888 

Francis I. Francoeur 1888 

♦John S. Drum, LL. B 1891 

Thaddeus E. Pawlicki, LL. B.1891 

Richard V. Curtis. LL. B 1892 

Robert J. Hicks 1893 

Benjamin L. McKinley, 

LL. B 1893 

Francis J. Burke, LL. B 1894 



97 

Attilio H. Giannini, M. D...1894 
Bernard F. McElroy, M. D.1894 
*Cyril P. Williams, B. S....1895 

Luke J. Flynn 1895 

♦John L. Mulrenin 1896 

Francis G. Reichling 1896 

Robert H. Richards 1896 

Francis A. Morton 1896 

Joseph M. Kelly 1896 

Richard C. Tobin, Jr 1896 

♦George J. Cleary 1897 

Francis L. Fenton, LL. B..1897 
Joseph F. Meagher, M. D...1897 
Milton B. Lennon, A. M., 

M. D 1897 

William A. Breen, LL. B...1898 

Percy R. Hennessy 1898 

Henry C. Costa 1898 

♦Walter J. M. Williams, M. D. 1899 

Henry D. Fanning, M. D 1899 

Rev. George Golden Fox, S.J.1899 

John N. Carrigan 1899 

Clarence Carrigan, Lieut. 

U. S. A..... 1899 

Joseph G. Freechtle 1899 

Leo C. Lennon, A. M., Ph. 

D., LL. B 1899 

Wylie J. Dunn 1899 

Michael F. Buckley 1900 

Rev. Zacheus J. Maher, S. J. 1900 

Edward F. O'Day 1900 

Stanislaus A. Riley, LL. B..1900 

Richard L. Williams 1900 

Constantine R. Bricca, M. D.1901 

William P. Golden 1901 

John E. Hughes, B. S 1901 

Hubert M. Hussey 1901 

Joseph A. Murphy 1901 

Louis X. Ryan, M. D 1901 

George A. Connolly, LL. B.1902 
Francis I. Barrett, LL. B...1902 

Frederick J. Churchill 1902 

Alfred J. Cleary, B. S 1902 

Edward A. Foley, LL. B 1902 

♦E. Owen McCann, M. E. ..1903 

Michael J. Coffey 1903 

Francis X. Williams 1903 



♦ cum laude. 



98 



St. Ignatius University 



Charles A. Schott 1904 

Robert X. Ryan, Jr 1904 

William A. Breen 1904 

Anthony J. Smith 1905 

John L. Whelan 1905 

Joseph R. Crowley, S. J 1905 

Thomas J. Flaherty, S. J... 1905 

Michael F. Nakamura 1906 

David A. O'Keeffe 1906 

Thomas S. Mangan 1906 

Richard A. Flanagan 1906 

Leo J. Flanagan, M. D 1906 

John A. Lennon, S. J 1907 

IRobert D. Rossi, B. S., 

U. S. A 1908 

t Joseph L. Sweeney 1908 

*Edmund A. Rossi, B. S 1908 

J. Raleigh Kelly, Jr 1908 

Lawrence A. Reagan 1909 

William E. McCann 1909 

Ireneus S. Smith 1909 

Edwin J. O'Hara, Major Ar- 
tillery Corps, U. S. A 1909 

John F. Duffy 1909 

John B. Ferguson 1909 

Rev. John P. Buckley 1909 

Richard J. Birmingham 1910 

James B. Molloy, U.S. A... 1910 

Adrian V. Buckley 1911 

Francis P. Buckley, Lieut. 

U. S. A 1911 

Everett E. Carreras, U. S. N. 1911 
John J. Casey, B. S., U. S. A. 1911 

Joseph F. Giannini 1911 

William J. Hyland 1911 

William A. Lafferty 1911 

Peter L. O'Keeffe, LL. B. . . .1911 

Robert D. Tobin 1911 

Walter J. Walsh 1911 

Richard C. Queen 1912 

Robert H. Heaney, M. D 1912 



Wensinger F. Mahoney, 

U. S. A 1912 

Joseph D. Toohig 1912 

Charles P. Knights 1912 

Francis J. DeAndreis, U.S.A. 1912 

Carl A. Dransfeld 1912 

Horace E. Chambers 1912 

C. Harold Caulfield. 1913 

John J. Schlappi 1913 

Vincent S. Brown, U. S. N..1913 

Robert L. Chambers 1913 

Edward M. O'Neill, U.S. A.. 1913 
fFrancis B. Lessmann, 

U. S. A 1914 

^Raymond T. Feely 1914 

♦James J. Harrington, Ser- 
geant U. S. A 1914 

James McG. Sullivan, U.S.A. 1914 

Frederick S. Johnson 1914 

Percy S. McCann 1914 

Warren W. Brown 1915 

Peter J. McHugh, Sergt. 

U. S. A 1915 

James E. Murphy, U.S. A.. 1915 
W. Hall Evans, Sergt. U.S.A. 1916 
Henry L. Flood, U. S. A. . . .1916 
Thomas H. Foster, U. S. A. .1916 
Francis J. Harrigan, U. S. A. 1916 

Thomas J. Lennon 1916 

Stanley F. Nolan, LL. B....1916 
Herman A. van der Zee, 

Corp. U. S. A 1916 

James P. Wall 1916 

Louis S. Borello 1917 

Terence J. Boyle, U.S. A... 1917 

T. Stanley Burns 1917 

Carolan S. Cronin 1917 

J. Frederick McDonald, 

U. S. A 1917 

Edmund J. Morrissey 1917 

Robert K. White, U.S. A... 1917 
Charles J. Wiseman, U.S.N. 1917 



* cum laude. 

t magna cum laude. 

t maxima cum laude. 



Alumni 



99 



DOCTORS OF LAW 



Joseph W. Beretta, A. B., 

LL. B 1916 

William A. Breen, LL, B....1916 
George A. Connolly, LL. B..1016 
Joseph A. Farry, A. B., 
LL. B 1916 



Edward J. McHenry 1915 

Joseph L. Sweeney 1915 

Francis P. Buckley 1915 

Joseph F. Vizzard 1915 

Edward H. Wall 1915 

Wm. I. O'Shaughnessy, A. B.1915 

Harry T. Crowley 1915 

William A. Lafferty 1915 

Francis J. Mannix 1915 

Henry S. Cramer 1915 

Vincent S. Brown 1916 

John M. Deady 1916 

Thomas S. Deering 1916 

♦Raymond T. Feely 1916 

Maurice H. Fitzgibbon 1916 

Thomas F. Gaffney 1916 

Joseph M. Golden 1916 

Royal E. Handlos 1916 

James J. Harrington 1916 

Leland R. Jacobson 1916 

*Eugene P. Jones 1916 

William J. Kelly 1916 

Wensinger F. Mahoney 1916 



*John J. Montgomery, Ph. D.1880 
* James F. Tevlin, LL. B...1881 

*John E. Fitzpatrick 1881 

Edward P. Luby 1884 

Eugene McFadden 1886 



Benjamin L. McKinley, 

LL. B 1916 

John O'Gara, A. M., LL. B.1916 
Stanislaus A. Riley, LL. B..1916 



A. Robert Miller 1916 

Francis M. Mulcrevy 1916 

Edward J. Queen 1916 

William M. Queen 1916 

*Hugh L. Smith 1916 

Paul A. Carew, Ensign U. 

S. N 1917 

William S. Coghlan, U. S. A. .1917 

Frank J. Creede 1917 

Francis J. De Andreis, A. B..1917 

Francis A. Devlin 1917 

Howard J. Finn, U. S. N 1917 

Harry T. Hennessy 1917 

James P. Keane 1917 

Gerald J. Kenny 1917 

Frank J. Mahoney, U. S. N..1917 
J. Regan Miller, U. S. A..., 1917 

James J. Moran 1917 

Carroll A. Murphy, U. S. A.. 1917 

Nicholas F. McMahon 1917 

William G. McMahon 1917 

James P. Riley 1917 



Frederick H. Jung, LL. B..1889 
Rev. James J. Conlon, S. J.. 1889 
Edward J. Banning, LL. B..1892 
J. Franklin Smith, M. D. . .1892 



BACHELORS OF LAW 



MASTERS OF SCIENCE 



* cum laude. 



100 



St. Ignatius University 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 



Jerome A. Hughes, M. D...1875 



Thomas Tully , 1875 

John W. Stateler 1876 

John J. Montgomery, Ph. D.1879 

Edward McGary 1879 

Richard P. Doolan 1879 

William C. Andrews 1879 

* James F. Tevlin, LL. B...1880 

William T. Kearns 1880 

John E. Fitzpatrick 1880 

Joseph Hughes 1880 

Francis G. Drum 1881 

James Dunn 1881 

John J. Dillon 1881 

J. Downey Harvey 1881 

Rev. Richard H. Bell, S. J.. 1881 

♦Eugene A. Beauce 1882 

Humphrey B. Moynihan 1882 

Frederick Morrison 1882 

Louis Koch 1882 

Wm. Wilson Knott 1882 

Joseph F. Bluxome, LL. B..1883 

Thomas F. Connolly 1883 

William Gilbert, LL. B 1883 

Francis P. Hughes 1883 

Edward P. Luby 1883 

Quirino R. Corbala 1884 

Ambrose O'Neill 1885 

Charles W. Callaghan 1885 



William H. Smith 1885 

Andrew G. Maguire, LL. B..1886 

♦Joseph W. Stapleton 1886 

Eugene McFadden 1886 

Ernest Hartman 1886 

Daniel V. Egan 1887 

John D. Costigan 1887 

Dennis F. Ahearn 1887 

Thomas J. O'Brien 1887 

William B. Ryder 1887 

Frederick H. Jung, LL. B..1888 
Rev. James J. Conlon, S. J.. 1888 

Oscar F. Rouleau 1889 

Edward Donohue 1889 

Guido E. Caglieri, M. D....1890 

Thomas P. Conlon 1890 

♦David M. Burnett, LL. B..1891 
James D. Fairchild, LL. B..1891 
J. Franklin Smith, M. D....1891 

John J. Gallagher, M. D 1891 

Maurice W. O'Connell, M. D.1891 
Edward J. Banning, LL. B..1892 
Francis P. Haynes, LL. B...1892 

John A. Lenahan, LL. B 1892 

Casimir F. Pawlicki, M. D.1892 
♦Charles W. Sweigert, LL. B.1893 
Thomas W. Hickey, LL. B..1893 
Saturnino Gonzalez 1893 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

♦T. Paul Ahern, Lieut. U. Louis J. Gallagher, Corp. 

S. A 1916 U. S. A 1916 

Cecil J. Decker, U.S.N 1916 ♦Francis B. Lessmann, 

U. S. A 1916 



♦ cum laude. 



HONORARY DEGREES 



DOCTORS OF LAW 

Charles W. Callaghan. . 1905 Hon. James D. Phelan.,1905 

Andrew Carrigan 1905 Richard E. Queen 1905 

Hon. James V. Coffey. .. 1905 Robert X. Ryan 1905 

John Downey Harvey. .. 1905 Hon. Frank J. Sullivan. . 1905 

Eugene P. Murphy 1905 Hon. Jeremiah F.Sullivan.1905 

Captain Albert H. Pay- Matthew I. Sullivan 1905 

son, U. S. A 1905 Joseph S. Tobin 1905 

DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 

Thomas E. Bailly, M. D.1905 John Gallwey, M. D....1905 
James R. Kelly 1907 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Henry F. Sullivan 1905 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS 

Thomas G. Hall 1914 

BACHELOR OF COMMERCE 



Pedro A. Espina 



1914 



EXTRAORDINARY PRIZES 



104 



St. Ignatius University 



THE ARCHBISHOP'S MEDAL 

The Gift of His Grace, the Most Rev. Archbishop 
Edward Joseph Hanna, D. D. 

FOR THE BEST ESSAY IN 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 



THE ALUMNI PRIZE 

A GOLD WATCH 

The Gift of the Alumni Association 
for 

RESEARCH IN THE HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA 



THE YOUNG MEN'S INSTITUTE MEDAL 

A GOLD MEDAL 

The Gift of Ignatian Council, No. 35, 
Young Men's Institute 
for 

ELOCUTION 



Extraordinary Prizes 105 

THE SMITH MEDAL 

A GOLD MEDAL 

The Gift of Dr. J. Franklin Smith, M. S., '92 

FOR THE 

BEST EXAMINATION IN IRISH HISTORY 



THE McKINLEY MEDAL 

A GOLD MEDAL 
The Gift of Benjamin L. McKinley, LL.D., A.M., '08 

TO THE 

BEST DEBATER IN THE SENIOR PHILHIS- 
TORIAN SOCIETY 



THE PHELAN PRIZE 

A PRIZE OF TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS 
The Gift of Hon. James D. Phelan, LL. D., A. B., '81 

FOR THE 

BEST PAPER IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 



106 St. Ignatius University 

THE BROOKE PRIZE 

A PRIZE OF TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS 
The Gift of John F. Brooke, A. B., '82 

FOR 

RESEARCH WORK IN THE LAW SCHOOL 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



THE PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIP 

Of One Hundred and Thirty Dollars a Year 
Tenable for four years 
The Gift of the President 



YOUNG MEN'S INSTITUTE SCHOLARSHIP 

Of One Hundred and Fifty Dollars a Year 
Tenable for four years 
The Gift of the Young Men's Institute 
Ignatian Council No. 35 



\ 



UNIVERSITY EVENTS 



108 St. Ignatius University 



GOLD MEDAL DEBATE 



SENIOR PHILHISTORIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 

COLLEGE OF LETTERS, SCIENCE AND 
PHILOSOPHY 

APRIL 29, 1918 



PROGRAM 

Overture University Orchestra 

Introductory Stanislaus A. Riley, LL. B., '00, Chairman 

Question 

Resolved, "That the Constitutional Amendment on 'National Pro- 
hibition,' passed by the United States Congress, should be 
ratified by the legislatures of the several states as provided 
by the Constitution." 

Affirmative: 

SIGMUND J. A. JANAS, '21 
NICHOLAS B. MAROEVICH, '21 
J. VICTOR CLARKE, '20 

Negative: 

WILLIAM T. SWEIGERT, '21 
LAWRENCE J. DAVEY, '20 
CHESTER OHLANDT, '20 

Interlude — Selection University Orchestra 

Decision of Judges. 
Finale University Orchestra 

The following have kindly consented to act as judges: 
BENJAMIN L. McKINLEY, LL. D., A. M., '08 
ATTILIO H. GIANNINI, M. D., A. B., '96 
JOSEPH A. MURPHY, A. B., '01 

The Medal to be awarded to the best debater is the gift of 

BENJAMIN L. McKINLEY, LL. D., A. M., '08. 
Debate won by Negative side. 
Medal won by J. Victor Clarke, '20. 

The Orchestra is under the direction of Mr. Albert H. Schuh. 



University Events 



109 



GOLD MEDAL DEBATE 



JUNIOR PHILHISJORIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 

ST. IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL 
University Auditorium 

APRIL 25, 1918 



PROGRAM 

Overture University Orchestra 

Introductory William T. Sweigert, Chairman 

Question 

Resolved, "That the United States should have two years' com- 
pulsory military service after the war." 

Affirmative: 

GERALD J. O'GARA 
WILLIAM A. REILLY 
CHARLES R. BODEN 

Negative : 

GERALD X. SULLIVAN 
GEORGE E. DEVINE 
NORBERT W. FEELY 

Interlude — Selection University Orchestra 

Decision of Judges. 
Finale University Orchestra 

The following have kindly consented to act as judges: 
EUSTACE CULLINAN, A. M., LL. B. 
CHARLES P. KNIGHTS, A. B., LL, B. 
JOSEPH W. BERETTA, A. B., LL. D. 

The Medal to be awarded the best debater is the gift of 

ST. IGNATIUS GENTLEMEN'S SODALITY. 
Debate won by Affirmative side. 
Medal won by William A. Reilly. 

The Orchestra is under the direction of Mr. Albert H. Schuh. 



110 



St. Ignatius University 



ELOCUTION CONTEST 



APRIL 4, 1918 
High School 



PROGRAM 



Overture University Orchestra 

Introductory Remarks William A. Reilly, 3d Year High 

Against Catiline — Cicero James A. O'Gara, 1st High B 

Shane's Head — Savage J. Preston Devine, 1st High A 

Dream of Eugene Aram — Hood George Lenahan, 1st High A 

How The LaRue Stakes Were Lost — Anon 

Mervyn J. O'Day, 1st High A 

Selection University Orchestra 

Pancratius — Wiseman Carsten F. Dahnken, 2d High A 

The Cremation of Sam McGee — Service. Martin H. O'Brien, 2d High A 

Jean Deprez — Service William A. O'Brien, 2d High A 

Prince Charles F. Ruggles, 2d High A 

Selection University Orchestra 

The Old Surgeon's Story — Anon. . .Charles F. Sweigert, 2d High A 

Almanzor — Anon Joseph Mayerle, 2d High B 

Horatius — Macaulay Walter A. Buckley, 3d High 

Selection University Orchestra 

The Hymn and the Cop — O. Henry Gerald J. O'Gara, 4th High 

Regulus to the Carthaginians — Kellogg.. .Norbert W. Feely, 4th High 
Selection University Orchestra 

Decision by the Judges — Messrs. George W. Paterson, Joseph 
L. Sweeney, C. Harold Caulfleld. 

The Medal to be awarded is the gift of the President and 
was won by Norbert W. Feely. 

The Orchestra is under the direction of Mr. Albert H. Schuh. 



University Events 



111 



ELOCUTION CONTEST 



APRIL 11, 1918 
The University 
PROGRAM 

Overture University Orchestra 

Introductory Remarks Melvyn I. Cronin, '19 

The United States, the Mainstay of Right Principles — Original 

Oration Edward I. Fitzpatrick, '21 

A War Poem — William T. Sweigert Sigmund J. A. Janas, '21 

Selection University Orchestra 

Humanity — Original Oration William T. Sweigert, '21 

Recitation — Selected Vincent W. Hallinan, '19 

The Death-dream — "The Bells" Ivan N. Maroevich, '18 

Selection University Orchestra 

Decision by the Judges — Messrs. George W. Paterson, Joseph 
L. Sweeney, C. Harold Caulfield. 

The Medal to be awarded is the gift of Ignatian Council, 
Y. M. I., No. 35, and was won by Ivan N. Maroevich, '18. 



The Orchestra is under the direction of Mr. Albert H. Schuh. 



FIFTY- NINTH 
ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 



114 St. Ignatius University 



LITERARY EXERCISES 



ST. IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL 
University Auditorium 



FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 31, 1918 



PROGRAM 

Overture University Orchestra 

Introductory Gerald X. Sullivan 

Vocal Selections Denis Sheerin 

March University Orchestra 

The Catholic Church and Patriotism Norbert W. Feely 

Selection University Orchestra 

Distribution of Ordinary Prizes — Conferring of Diplomas 

Address Very Rev. P. J. Foote, S. J. 

Finale University Orchestra 



GRADUATING EXERCISES 



ST. IGNATIUS UNIVERSITY 
Knights of Columbus Hail 



TUESDAY, JUNE 4, 1918 



PROGRAM 

Overture University Orchestra 

Two Systems of Government — A Contrast 

Edmund J. Holl, Candidate LL. B., College of Law 

Selection University Orchestra 

The Nobility of Sacrifice 

Ivan N. Maroevich, Candidate A.B., College of Letters, Science 
and Philosophy. 

Selection University Orchestra 

Award of Prizes — Conferring of Degrees 

Address 

His Grace, the Most Rev. Archbishop Edward J. Hanna, D. D. 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



116 



St. Ignatius University 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1918. 



BACHELOR OF LAWS 



Vincent I. Compagno 
Edmund J. Holl 
Arthur J. Hearst 
Frank T. Kennedy 



William W. Murphy 
Joseph F. O'Malley 
James P. Wall 
Chan C. Wing 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Ivan N. Maroevich D. William O'Connell 

Raymond D. Williamson 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT: 
Congressional Record. 
Smithsonian Publications. 
Educational Department Pamphlets. 

THE STATE GOVERNMENT: 

Official publications. 
THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA : 

Official Publications. 

MRS. CORNELIA E, McCABE: 

Several Volumes of History. 

The Donors of the various Medals and Scholar- 
ships offered to the students of the University and High 
School this past session. 



HIGH SCHOOL 



118 



St. Ignatius High School 



INSTRUCTORS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL COURSE 



Mr. ARTHUR V. COGHLAN, S. J. 
Fourth Year 

Mr. EDWIN A. McFADDEN, S. J. 
Third Year 

Mr. AUSTIN T. HOWARD, S. J. 
Second Year — Division A 

Mr. PATRICK SAVAGE, S. J. 
Second Year — Division B 

Mr. ALEXANDER J. OYARZO, S. J. 
First Year — Division A 

Mr. ALOYSIUS M. TORRE, S. J. 
First Year — Division B 

Rev. PETER C. BOUGIS, S. J. 
Rev. LEO DAVROUT, S. J. 
French 

Rev. JOSEPH SPANGEMACHER, S. J. 
Rev. MARTIN J. MAHER, S. J. 
German 

Rev. JOHN J. CUNNINGHAM, S. J. 
Rev. JOHN B. SARDI, S, J. 
Spanish 

Rev. GEORGE A. GILBERT, S. J. 
Physics and Trigonometry 

Rev. JAMES J. CONLON, S. J. 
Chemistry 



COURSES OF STUDY 

These courses, lasting four years, are a preparation 
for the University. In the achievement of this purpose 
the Ancient Classics hold the first place as the most 
efficient instrument of mental discipline ; for it has been 
found by long experience that the careful study of the 
Latin and Greek writers is the only means that gives 
a normal development to all the faculties, forms a cor- 
rect taste, teaches the student how to use all his powers 
to the best advantage and prepares him to follow with 
success the higher Studies. Still it must not be 
thought that other studies universally recognized for 
their cultural value are neglected. They, too, hold an 
important place in the curriculum of this High School, 
e. g., the thorough training in Mathematics, Physics, 
Chemistry and in the theory and practice of Written 
and Oral Expression, as will be seen from the course 
of studies outlined below. 

All the Instructors of Latin in the Latin Depart- 
ment speak that language. 

The Students of the High School are subject to the 
general regulations found on pages 10, 11, 12, 13. 

In the following schedule of studies a period lasts 
forty-five minutes unless otherwise stated. 



120 St. Ignatius High School 



FIRST YEAR 

(Infimae Classis Or do Inferior) 

la. Religion. Two periods, First Semester. 

Christian Doctrine. Text: The Baltimore Cate- 
chism, Kinkead, Number 3, to lesson 16 inclusive. 

lb. Religion. Two periods, Second Semester. 

Christian Doctrine. Text: The Baltimore Cate- 
chism, Kinkead, from lesson 17 to end of book. 

2a. Latin. Six hours, First Semester. 

Precepts : Text. Latin for the First Year, Gun- 
nison and Harley, to page 163. 
Authors: Nepos and Phaedrus. 
Practice: Themes from home daily in imitation 
of Authors read. Latin Conversation in Class. 

2b. Latin. Six hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Text. Latin for the First Year, Gun- 
nison and Harley, from page 164 to the end of 
the book. 
Authors: Nepos and Phaedrus. 
Practice: As under Number 2a. 
3a. English. Five periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: Text. Practical English, Lewis and 
Hosic. 

Authors: Irving, The Sketch Book; Goldsmith, 
The Deserted Village ; Scott, Lady of the Lake ; 



Courses of Study 



read entire and selections memorized, recited 
with proper expression and criticized. 
Practice : One Composition from home every 
Monday; one theme from home on Friday, with 
special attention to correct use of words. 

3b. English. Five periods, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Text. Practical English, Lewis and 
Hosic. 

Authors: Irving, The Sketch Book; Goldsmith, 
The Traveler; Macaulay, Lays of Ancient Rome; 
read as a whole and recited in part from mem- 
ory with attention to expression and criticized 
according to precepts studied. 

Practice : One Composition from home, Mon- 
day ; one Theme on Precepts, from home, Fri- 
day. 

4a. History. Four periods, First Semester. 

Text: The Ancient World, West-Betten, S. J. 
Part I, Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Asia 
Minor, Greece, to page 119. 

4b. History. Four periods, Second Semester. 

Text: The Ancient World, West-Betten, S. J. 
* Part I, Greece, Completed. 

5a. Mathematics. Five periods, First Semester. 

Text : Wentworth-Smith, Elementary Algebra, 
from the beginning to Common Factors and 
Multiples. 

Practice: Home problems on Tuesday and 
Thursday. 



122 



St. Ignatius High School 



5b. Mathematics. Five periods, Second Semester. 
Text : Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra, from 
Multiples to Graphs of Linear Equations, inclu- 
sive. 

Practice: Home problems, on Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

6a. Elementary Science. Three periods, First Sem- 
ester. 

Text: Civic Biology, Hunter. Lectures, Recita- 
tions and Illustrations. 

6b. Elementary Science. Three periods, Second 
Semester. 

Text: Civic Biology, Hunter. Lectures, Recita- 
tions and Illustrations. 



Courses of Study 



SECOND YEAR 

(Iniimae Classis Or do Superior) 

7a. Religion. Two periods, First Semester. 

Kinkead's Explanation of the Baltimore Catechism, 
from beginning to ^age 177. 

7b. Religion. Two periods, Second Semester. 

Kinkead's Explanation of the Baltimore Catechism, 
completed. 

8a. Latin. Five hours, First Semester. 

Precepts: Declensions and Conjugations and 
Syntax thoroughly reviewed, with attention to 
most important notes and exceptions. 

Text: Bennett, Latin Grammar, to page 105. 

Authors : Caesar, Gallic War, Book I, Gunnison 
and Harley. 

Practice: Themes from home daily, in imitation 
of Authors read; Conversation in Class. 

8b. Latin. Five hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Irregular and Defective Verbs; Ad- 
verbs, Prepositions, Interjections and Conjunc- 
tions, Word formation. Syntax. 

Text: Bennett, Latin Grammar, from page 106 
to page 227. 

Authors: Caesar, Gallic War, II, III, IV. Gunni- 
son and Harley. 
Practice : Themes, etc., as in 8a. 



124 St. Ignatius High School 



9a. Greek. Four periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: Text, White, Greek for Beginners, 

from beginning to page 126, inclusive. 
Author: Moss, First Greek Reader. 
, Practice: One Theme from home on Wednes- 
day. 

9b. Greek. Four periods, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Text, White, Greek for Beginners, 

completed. 
Author: Moss, Greek Reader. 
Practice: One Theme from home on Wednes- 
day. 

10a. English. Five periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: The Sentence and its Words. Text, 
Imitation and Analysis, Donnelly, S. J. 

Authors: Poe, Poems; Scott, Ivanhoe; Shake- 
speare, Julius Caesar. Read entire ; select pas- 
sages recited from memory with attention to ex- 
pression; criticized. 

Practice: One Composition from home on Mon- 
day; one Theme on Friday. 

10b. English. Five periods, Second Semester. 

Precepts: The Paragraph and its Rules. Text, 

Imitation and Analysis, Donnelly, S. J. 
Authors: Hawthorne, The Great Stone Face; 

Lowell, Vision of Sir Launfal ; Shakespeare, As 

You Like It. Read, recited and criticized as 

above in No. 10a. 
Practice: As above m No. 10a, 



Courses of Study 



125 



11a. History. Three periods, First Semester. 

Text: The Ancient World, Part II, West-Betten, 
S. J. ; Roman History to page 490. 

lib. History. Three periods, Second Semester. 
Text : The Ancient World, etc., completed. 

12a. Mathematics. Five periods, First Semester. 
Text: Wentworth, Elementary Algebra, from 

page 199 to page 296. 
Practice: Problems from home every Tuesday 

and Thursday. 

12b. Mathematics. Five periods, Second Semester. 
Text: Wentworth, Elementary Algebra, from 

page 296 to the Binomial Theorem. 
Practice: Problems from home every Tuesday 

and Thursday. 

13a. Elementary Science. Two periods, First Sem- 
ester. 

Text : Introduction to General Science. Rowell. 
With Lectures and Illustrations. 

13b. Elementary Science. Two periods, Second 
Semester. 

Text: Introduction to General Science, Rowell. 
With Lectures and Illustrations. 



126 



St. Ignatius High School 



14a. Elective (One Modern Language). Three pe- 
riods, First Semester. 
Spanish, Grammar, Monsanto-Languellier. Au- 
thor, Escrich, Fortuna. French, Grammar, Ele- 
mentary French, Aldrich & Foster. Author, La 
Fontaine, Easier Fables. German, Grammar, 
Bierwirth ; Meras' Ein Wortschatz. Or, Draw- 
ing, Free hand, Mechanical, Linear. 

14b. Elective. Three periods, Second Semester. 
As in No. 14a. 



Courses of Study 



127 



THIRD YEAR 

(Media Classis Grammatics) 

15a. Religion. Two periods, First Semester. 

Text: Lanslots, Catholic Theology, to page 156. 

15b. Religion. Two periods, Second Semester. 

Text: Lanslots, Catholic Theology, to page 304. 

16a. Latin. Five hours, First Semester. 

Precepts: Syntax, 1st half. Text, Bennett's Latin 
Grammar. 

Authors: Cicero, In Catilinam I, II, III; Ovid, 
Metamorphoses I. 

Practice : Themes from home daily based on Au- 
thors read or on Arnold's Latin Prose Compo- 
sition. Conversation in Class. 

16b. Latin. Five hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts : Syntax Completed ; Bennett's Latin 
Grammar. 

Authors: Cicero, In Catilinam, IV; pro Archia. 

Ovid, Metamorphoses II, III. 
Practice: As under 16a. 

17a. Greek. Four hours, First Semester. 

Precepts: Syntax. Text, Yenni, S. J., Greek 
Grammar. 

Authors: Xenophon, The Anabasis, Books I, II. 
Anacreon, Odes 1 to 10. 

Practice: One Theme from home on Wednes- 
day; Conversation in Class. 



128 



St. Ignatius High School 



17b. Greek. Four hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Syntax. Text, Yenni, S. J., Greek 
Grammar. 

Authors : Xenophon, The Anabasis, Books III, 
IV. St. John Chrysostom, In Eutropium. Hero- 
dotus, Histories, I and V. 

18a. English. Four periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: Text, Elements of Composition, Can- 
by & Opdycke ; first half of book. 

Authors : Tennyson, Enoch Arden ; Longfellow, 
The Golden Legend ; Shakespeare, Merchant of 
Venice ; Poe, Short Stories ; read entire, por- 
tions memorized and recited by heart with due 
attention to expression ; criticized. 

Practice: Composition from home every Mon- 
day; Theme every Tuesday. 

18b. English. Four periods, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Text, Elements of Composition by 
Canby & Opdycke, completed. 

Authors : Arnold, Sohrab and Rustum ; Dickens, 
Tale of Two Cities ; Stevenson, Essays ; read 
entire and memorized in part ; recited and criti- 
cized. 

Practice: Composition from home every Mon- 
day; Theme every Tuesday. 

19a. History. Two periods, First Semester. 

Text: Cheyney's Short History of England, first 
half of book. 

19b. History. Two periods, Second Semester. 

Text: Cheyney's Short History of England, com- 
pleted. 



Courses of Study 



129 



20a. Mathematics. Four hours, First Semester. 

Text: Geometry, Plane and Solid, Wentworth, 
begun. 

20b. Mathematics. Four hours, Second Semester. 

Text: Geometry, Plane and Solid, Wentworth, 
completed. 

21a. Physics. (Two periods, Lecture; Three periods, 
Laboratory), First Semester. 

A connected and comprehensive view of the entire 
subject of High School Physics is given in the 1st 
and 2d Semesters. This includes: (1) Instruction by 
lecture table demonstrations, to illustrate the facts 
and phenomena of physics in their qualitative aspects 
and in their practical applications ; (2) Individual lab- 
oratory work, consisting of experiments requiring the 
time of forty double periods. 

Two hours of laboratory are equivalent to one hour 
of classroom work. Special attention is paid to the 
common illustrations of physical laws and to their 
industrial applications. 

Text : First Course in Physics, Millikan and Gale. 
Laboratory Physics, Millikan-Gale-Bishop. 

21b. Physics. (Two periods, Lecture; Three pe- 
riods, Laboratory), Second Semester. 
Text: As under 21a. 



130 



St. Ignatius High School 



22a. Elective (One Modern Language). Three pe- 
riods, First Semester. 
Spanish, Grammar, Monsanto & Languellier; Au- 
thor, El Pajaro Verde; French, Grammar, Ele- 
mentary French, Aldrich & Fisher; Author, De 
Maistre, Les Prisonniers du Caucase; German, 
Grammar, Bierwirth; or Drawing. 

22b. Elective. (As under 22a.) 



Courses of Study 



131 



FOURTH YEAR 

(Suprema Classis Grammaticce ) 

23a. Religion. Two periods, First Semester. 

Text: Lanslot, Catholic Theology, to page 463. 

23b. Religion. Two periods, Second Semester. 
Text: Lanslot, Catholic Theology, completed. 

24a. Latin. Five hours, First Semester. 

Precepts: Prosody. Yenni, S. J., Latin Gram- 
mar. 

Authors: Vergil, Aeneid, I, II, III; Cicero, Pro 
Marcello; De Oratore; Tibullus, Elegiae. 

Practice: Themes from home daily, based on 
Authors read, or on Arnold's Prose Composition. 
Conversation ; Sight Reading. 

24b. Latin. Five hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Prosody, Yenni, S. J., Latin Gram- 
mar. Latin Style, &c, Bennett, Latin Grammar. 

Authors : Cicero, Pro Ligario ; Ad Quintum Fra- 
trem; Vergil, Aeneid, V, VI; Propertius, Ele- 
giae. 

Practice: See under 24a. 

25a. Greek. Four periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: Syntax, Thoroughly reviewed. Text, 
Yenni, S. J., Greek Grammar. 
Authors : Lucian, Dialogues ; Homer, Odyssey, I. 
Practice: One Theme from home on Wednes- 
day ; Conversation in class ; Sight Reading. 



132 



St. Ignatius High School 



25b. Greek. Four hours, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Review of Syntax Completed. Text, 

Yenni, S. J., Greek Grammar. 
Authors: Homer, Odyssey, II, III, IV, V; 

Xenophon, Cyropaedia I, II. 
Practice: As under 25a. 

26a. English. Five periods, First Semester. 

Precepts: Text, Coppens, S. J., Introduction to 
English Rhetoric, from page 9 to page 129 ; 
Jenkins, Handbook of English Literature. 
Authors: Stevenson, Essays; Tennyson, Idylls 
of the King; Newman, Callista; read entire; 
selections memorized and recited in class with 
proper expression ; criticized according to pre- 
cepts. 

Practice: One Composition from home every 
Monday; one theme on Friday. 

26b. English. Five periods, Second Semester. 

Precepts: Text, Coppens, S. J., Introduction to 

English Rhetoric, from page 130 to page 251 ; 

Jenkins, Handbook of English Literature. 
Authors: Johnson, Rasselas; Addison, Essays 

from the Spectator; Thackeray, Pendennis. 
Practice: As above under 26a. 

27a. History. Three periods, First Semester. 

Text: Muzzey, History of the United States, 
to page 276. 

Civics: Text. The Government and Politics of 
the United States, Guitteau. 



Courses of Study 



133 



27b. History. Three periods, Second Semester. 

Text: Muzzey, History of the United States, 
completed. 

Civics : Text. The Government and Politics of 
the United States, Guitteau. 

28a. Mathematics. Five periods, First Semester. 
Text : Plane Trigonometry, Wentworth, begun. 

28b. Mathematics. Five periods, Second Semester. 
Text : Plane Trigonometry, Wentworth, completed. 

29a. Chemistry. (Two periods, Lecture and Reci- 
tation; Three periods, Laboratory), First 
Semester. 

Text: First Principles of Chemistry, Brownlee, 
Hancock, etc., begun. 

29b. Chemistry. (Two periods, Lecture and Reci- 
tation; Three periods, Laboratory), Second 
Semester. 

Text: First Principles of Chemistry, Brownlee, 
Hancock, etc., completed. 

30a. Elective (One Modern Language). Three pe- 
riods, First Semester. 
Spanish, Grammar, Monsanto "& Languellier; Au- 
thor, Don Quijote; French, Grammar; Author, 
Telemaque ; German, grammar, Bierwirth ; or 
Drawing, Linear, Mechanical, Free Hand. 
30b. Elective (One Modern Language). Three pe- 
riods, First Semester. 

Spanish, Grammar, Monsanto & Languellier; Au- 



St, Ignatius High School 

thor, Coloma, Juan Miseria, Pequeneces. French, 
Grammar, Fraser & Squeir; Author, Daudet, 
Petit Chose. German, Bierwerth; Author, 

; or Drawing, Linear, Mechanical, 

Freehand. 



EXTRAORDINARY PRIZES 



A GOLD MEDAL 

The Gift of the Gentlemen's Sodality of 
St. Ignatius Church 

to the 

BEST DEBATER IN THE JUNIOR PHILHIS- 
TORIAN DEBATING SOCIETY 



A GOLD MEDAL 

The Gift of Mrs. Eleanor Martin 
for the best paper in 
ELEMENTARY LATIN 



A GOLD MEDAL 

The Gift of the President 
for 

ELOCUTION IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 



136 



St. Ignatius High School 



LIST OF STUDENTS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 

1917-1918 



FIRST YEAR HIGH A 



Badger, Raymond T. 
Baxter, Horace A. 
Bannon, Philip L. 
Barrett, Robert C. 
Boden, Matthew M. 
Burke, Urban M. 
Corbett, James A. 
Daley, Lester E. 
Davinroy, Elmer L. 
Dean, II, Walter E. 
Devine, John Preston 
Dolan, Michael J. 
Dunn, Arthur E. 
Desnouee, Marcel H. 
Flynn, Francis M. 
Graves, Hugh M. 
Hall, Irving W. 
Healy, Leland F. 
Keil, Edward D. 
Lawless, Edward J. 
Lenahan, George 



Mackall, John L. 
Muller, Edward P. 
Muller, James A. 
McCarthy, Charles Leo 
McAuliffe, James P. 
McDonald, Eugene L. 
McGinnis, Thomas B. 
Nolan, William N. 
O'Day, Mervyn J. 
O'Dowd, Maurice P. 
Popes, Alan Albert 
Radford, Edmund J. 
Ragan, Albert 
Redmond, Irving E. 
Rennie, A. R. 
Rice, William I. 
Riley, John F. 
Sheehan, Joseph A. 
Sheerin, David W. 
Willoh, August B. 



FIRST YEAR HIGH B 



Casselli, Frank E. 
Clancy, David H. 
Corbett, James A. 
Creedon, Jeremiah J. 
Cullinan, Eustace P. 
Cunningham, Francis J. 
Curran, John T. 
Ermet, Wilfrid C. 
Ferrante, Ambrose A. 
Francis, Sidney R. 
Fugazi, Samuel B. 



Galiasso, Lewis G. 
Gallagher, Francis I. 
Gallagher, Joseph D. 
Ghirardelli, George J. 
Haller, Joseph P. 
Henry, Michael P. 
Jensen, Austin Cyril 
Keith, Chester J. 
Kelly, Edward B. 
Kelly, Peter J. 
Kinzie, Robert A. 



List of Students in the High School 



Lane, John E. 
Larkins, Kenneth J. 
Larney, John F. 
Lucey, James D. 
Meaney, Joseph A. 
Molony, Francis D. 
McCormick, Gerald P. 
Olson, Oliver J. 
Olcese, Silvio C. 
O'Brien, Frank J. 

SECOND 

Abrahamsen, Gunlek O 
Brown, Edward E. 
Brimi, Edward J. 
Burns, Raymond S. 
Carlin, John T. 
Cleary, Gerald G. 
Connolly, Eugene P. 
Dahnken, Carsten F. 
Daley, John J. 
Donahue, Leonard S. 
Fulton, Robert V. 
Gliebe, Anthony P. 
Glynn, Anthony W. 
Hanley, William G. 



O'Connell, Edmund I. 
O'Gara, James A. 
Redmond, John J. 
Ryan, Thomas C. 
Savage, Joseph A. 
Simpson, Millen L. 
Smith, Cyril J. 
Sullivan, Harold B. 
Tiernan, John L. 

YEAR HIGH A 

James, Daniel W. 
Kane, Gerald J. 
Koetters, Berthold J. 
Lenahan, John A. Jr. 
Looney, Joseph A. 
Mahoney, William P. 
Molgaard, Holger V. 
McQuaid, A. Donald 
O'Brien, Martin H. 
O'Brien, William A. 
O'Connor, Martin J. 
Ruggles, Charles F. 
Stapleton, George P. 
Sweigert, Charles F. 



SECOND YEAR HIGH B 



Brennan, William A. 
Cavanagh, John T. 
Coakley, Gerald L. 
Conlan, John L. 
Corbett, Eugene J. 
Cronin, Harold J. 
Doran, John J. 
Farrell, J. Leonard 
Finnegan, Joseph A. 
Kropp, Walter J. 
Labagh, P. Steele 
Lagomarsino, Cyril A. 
Magner, John F. 



Maloney, Peter W. 
Mayer, Louis A. 
Mayerle, Joseph A. 
Norton, Leo F. 
O'Connor, Emmet J. 
O'Sullivan, Carroll M. 
Polanco, Quirino G. 
Ragan, Arthur N. 
Sullivan, Martin L. 
Tinney, Henry C. 
Tovaraz, Martin R. 
Uhl, George J. 



138 



St. Ignatius High School 



THIRD YEAR HIGH. 



Boden, Charles R. 
Brown, Darrell L. 
Buckley, Walter A. 
Casey, Albert M. 
Cereghino, Raymond E. 
Chie, Joseph 
Cosgrove, Lloyd J. 
Cotter, Thomas M. 
Cunningham, Byron J. 
Devine, George E. 
Donnelley, Neil P. 
Doyle, Norbert F. 
Duffy, James R. 
Egan, Raymond S. 
Flynn, Frank X. 
Grady, Raymond A. 
Granucci, Adolph A. 
Harney, Charles L. 
Harris, Edwin L. 
Keegan, Ernest T. 



Kurihara, Joseph Y. 
Mahoney, Thomas L. 
Mohun, Charles C. 
Mullaney, William L. 
Murphy, Edward V. 
McBride, Gerald I. 
Orme, Eugene J. 
Orme, Richard J. 
O'Brien, Henry C. 
O'Meara, Eugene L. 
Puckett, George J. 
Ragan, Frank J. 
Reilly, William A. 
Rethers, Charles A. 
Scheid, Aubrey A. 
Schulz, A. Harold 
Slater, Edmund I. 
Upp, William A. 
Wieland, Max J. 



FOURTH YEAR HIGH 



Bassett, Jordan R. 
Born, Howard J. 
Boyle, Leo F. 
Callaghan, Charles W. 
Cantwell, Wilbur A. 
Chiappari, Hugo L. 
Daly, C. Emmet 
Davitt, Lawrence J. 
Feely, Norbert W. 
Francis, Norbert H. 
Gallagher, Francis J. 
Hughes, John C. 
Hughes, Robert J. 
King, Francis A. 



Kunst, Charles J. 
Mahoney, Albert F. 
McGuire, Vincent A. 
McHugh, Frank J. 
O'Brien, Vincent P. 
O'Gara, Gerald J. 
Rethers, Edward J. 
Rossi, P. Carlo 
Sehabiague, Honore A. 
Sullivan, Gerald X. 
Varni, Edward J. 
Wallis, Albert C. 
Young, Alex J. 



REOPENING 

The Next Session Will Open Monday, August 
5, 1918, for High School and University. 

Entrance Examinations will be held at 9 A. M., 
Thursday, August 1, 1918, at the University, 2211 Hayes 
St., San Francisco. 

Applications must be made before August 1, 1918, 
and in every case must be accompanied by credentials 
testifying to the moral character and scholarship of 
the applicant. 



Index 141 
INDEX 



FACULTY 

Officers of the University 3 

Staff 4 

PROSPECTUS 

Scope and Aim of University: 

Charter 9 

Directors and Aim 9 

Courses of Studies 10 

Degrees and their Conditions 10 

General Regulations: 

The Scholastic Year 10 

Conditions of Admission 11 

Conditions of Promotion 11 

Report of Class Standing 11 

Home Study and Daily Lessons 11 

Regularity and Punctuality 12 

Conduct and Discipline 13 

Withdrawal of Students 13 

Religious Obligations 13 

Tuition and Other Fees 14 

Courses of Instruction: 

College of Letters, Science and Philosophy 15 

College of Law 39 

College of Engineering 57 

Pre-Medical Course 71 

Student Organizations 79 



142 , Index 



Officers: 

Senior Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 82 

St. John Berchmans Sanctuary Society 83 

Apostleship of Prayer..-. 83 

Alumni Association 83 

Philalethic Debating Society 84 

Senior Philhistorian Debating Society 84 

Junior Philhistorian Debating Society 85 

St. Ignatius Dramatic Society 86 

The Ignatian 86 

The Orchestra 87 

The Band 87 

Student Body Association 85 

Calendar 1918-1919 88 

Roster of Students 1917-1918 91 

Alumni 96 

Extraordinary Prizes 103 

University Events 107 

Acknowledgments 116 

High School 117 

Reopening 139